Mary Indenden

F
     Mary was born.1 She was the daughter of John Indenden and Christian Mercer. She married Thomas Soole on 16 October 1598 at Hawkhurst, county Kent, England.1 Mary Indenden was present at Sarah Soole's christening on 8 June 1600 at Hawkhurst, county Kent, England.1

Children of Mary Indenden and Thomas Soole

Citations

  1. [S198] Soule Genealogy, Ridlon, G.T. Sr. , vol 1 pg 105.

Roger Goodspeed

M, d. 1685
     Roger was born at Wingrave, county Bucks, England.1
     
      Roger Goodspeed of Barnstable in Plymouth Colony, the immigrant ancestor of the American Goodspeeds, was born probably at Wingrave, Co. Bucks, and died in testate. As stated his father in his will dated 15 Sept. 1658 bequeathed to him and to his brothers Bennett and Thomas 6£ 13s 4d each, if they or any of them return from beyond the seas within ten years after their fathers decease. He came to Barnstable in 1639, and in 1643 was on the list of those able to bear arms. His wife was admitted to the church 31 Dec. 1643, and he was admitted to the church 28 July 1644.
      Roger was indiscreet enough on one occasion to get himself into rather serious trouble, as shown by the following complaint and proceedings on the records of Plymouth Colony:
      "John Jenkins, of Barnstable, [who we are also related to] complained against Roger Goodspeed in an action of defamation to the damage of fifty pound, in his charging of the said complainant to be a lyer, and that he had stolen his kidd, biding all the people there to take notice thereof; this being on a lecter day, in September last, in the publicke meeting house there, before sundry people.
      The jury find for the plaintiff twenty pounds damage, and the coste of the suite, or an acknowledgement to the satisfaction of the Court, and the coste of the suite."
      Roger accepted the alternative as shown by the following entry taken from the same record:
      "THE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF ROGER GOODSPEED"
      "These are to certify whom it may concern, That what words passed from mee, Roger Goodspeed, att the meeting house att Barnstable concerning John Jenkins, his stealing my kidd and lying, were rash, unadvised aand inconsiderate words; and upon due consideration I see I had noe cause soe to say, and ame sorry for soe saying, and desire him to passe it by.
      Roger Goodspeed X his mark"
      A marginal note in the records states, "This was ended by acknowledgement." It may not be out of place in this connection to say Roger exhibited more courage than discretion. It required considerable "nerve" to openly charge a neighbor with theft and falsehood on a lecture day before all the people. He must have been both corageous and physically strong or Jenkins would then and there have resented the impeachment.




He was the son of Robert Goodspeed and Alice Harris. He married Alice Layton on 1 December 1641 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2,3 Roger died in 1685.1

Children of Roger Goodspeed and Alice Layton

Citations

  1. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.
  2. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 311.

Alice Layton

F, d. 10 January 1688/89
     Alice was born.1 She married Roger Goodspeed on 1 December 1641 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2,3 Alice died on 10 January 1688/89 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.4

Children of Alice Layton and Roger Goodspeed

Citations

  1. [S435] GENEA. NOTES OF BARN. FAM. PGS 397.
  2. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 311.
  4. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.

Nathaniel Goodspeed

M, b. 6 October 1642, d. 1670
     Nathaniel was born on 6 October 1642 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Roger Goodspeed and Alice Layton. Nathaniel died in 1670 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1

Citations

  1. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.

John Goodspeed

M, b. 15 June 1645, d. 1719
      John passed the first few years of his life at Barnstable, but after about 1647 lived uninterruptedly at Misteake. Upon his marriage, his father no doubt gave him a small tract of land at Misteake for a home, probably the nucleus of the estate owned by him there afterward. After reaching the proper age, he was made a freeman and townsman. In 1675 he participated in the "Narragansett Wars" of King Philip and his allies. He was in the third expedition under Capt. Thomas Howe, and very probably was in one or more of the other three expeditions. This is rendered likely by the fact that in the division of the gratuity of land granted the soldiers of these wars, John received 112 lots, while his brother Ebenezer, who also participated, received but 85 lots. It would seem, therefore, that John served twice and Ebenezer but once. They seem to have participated in the bloody battle of Rehobeth 26 March 1676, where the white mortality was very great; but the power of Philip was largely crushed. His will was probated 22 June 1719. . He was a farmer. John was born on 15 June 1645 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Roger Goodspeed and Alice Layton. He married Experience Holley on 9 January 1668/69 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2,3 John died in 1719.1

Children of John Goodspeed and Experience Holley

Citations

  1. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.
  2. [S99] Goodspeed Genealogy, Otis, Amos , pg 79;.
  3. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 3 pg 86.

Benjamin Goodspeed

M, b. 6 May 1649
     Benjamin was born on 6 May 1649 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Roger Goodspeed and Alice Layton.

Citations

  1. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.

Ruth Goodspeed

F, b. 10 April 1652
     Ruth was born on 10 April 1652 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Roger Goodspeed and Alice Layton.

Citations

  1. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title", vol 82 pg 452.

John Howland

M, b. circa 1592, d. 23 February 1672/73
     He was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at London, county Middlesex, England. John was born circa 1592 at Fen Stanton, county Huntingtonshire, England.1,2 He was the son of Henry Howland and Margaret NN----. He married Elizabeth Tilley on 25 March 1624 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.3 According to conflicting evidence, he married Elizabeth Tilley on 14 August 1623 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.4 John Howland was Bench & Bar between 1632 and 1634 at Judge of the Court of Assistants, Plymouth, Massachusets. John died on 23 February 1672/73 at Rocky Nook, Kingston, Massachusetts.5 John Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, a passenger on the famous ship "Mayflower", was the indentured manservant of Mr. John Carver, a wealthy Londoner, who became the first governor of New Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. On 11 November 1620, as the ship lay at anchor in Cape Cod Bay, John Howland was the thirteenth man to sign the "Mayflower Compact", the agreement which laid the foundation for the new town that the able-bodied men on board the "Mayflower" planned to create when the group landed in what was to become Plymouth, Massachusetts.

John grew up in Fenstanton, a town nine miles northwest of Cambridge on the old Roman Road. No baptismal record has been found for John Howland but he was said to have been "above eighty years when he died.

John Howland of the "Mayflower" was called by Governor William Bradford" a lusty young man". He was one of the hired hands among the "Mayflower" company, being neither a "Saint", as the Pilgrims were called, nor a "Stranger", engaged for a specific duty, as was the soldier, Captain Myles Standish. During the voyage across the North Atlantic, the "Mayflower" buffeted by severe autumn storms during which she was forced to drop her sails and head into the wind, wallowing in the mountainous waves. John Howland ventured on deck and was washed overboard into the boiling sea. In Governor Bradford's words, "It pleased God that he caught hold of ye halliards which hunge over board, and rane out at length; yet he was held up...and then with a boat hooke and other means got into ye ship again." It was this tenacity of purpose, perseverance, and the ability to deal with unexpected emergencies that helped John Howland to become a successful leader in the Plymouth community.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more." His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. Since the Carver had no children, John Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived.

Children of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 1;.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 49+51.
  3. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 2.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 394.
  5. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 1.

Elizabeth Tilley

F, b. 30 August 1607, d. 21 December 1687
     Elizabeth was born on 30 August 1607 at Henlow, county Bedford, England.1,2,3,4,5 She was the daughter of John Tilley and Joan Hurst.
     
      Elizabeth was a woman of superior natural ability and earnest Christian faith and was a help meet for the sturdy pilgrim, John Howland. She passed the closing days of her life with her daughter Lydia Brown in Swanzey where she died according to the Swanzey town records at age 80. This proves she was but 13 when she arrived in Plymouth aboard the Mayflower.
     
     
      ELIZABETH (TILLEY) HOWLAND'S WILL

      Transcribed from the original records,
      BY GEORGE ERNEST BOWMAN.
Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland, widow of John Howland and daughter of John Tilley, died at Swansea on Wednesday, 21/31 December, 1687, at the house of her daughter Lydia, the wife of James Brown. Her will is recorded in the Bristol County, Mass., Probate Records, Volume 1, pages 13 and 14. No inventory is on record and the original will has disappeared from the files.
In ye Name of God Amen I Elizabeth Howland of Swanzey in ye County of Bristoll in ye Collony of Plymouth in New Engld being Seventy nine yeares of Age but of good & perfect memory thanks be to Allmighty God & calling to Remembrance ye uncertain Estate of this transitory Life & that all flesh must Yeild unto Death when it shall please God to call Doe make constitute & ordaine & Declare This my last Will & Testament, in manner & forme following Revoking and Anulling by these prsents all & every Testamt & Testamts Will & Wills heretofore by me made & declared either by Word or Writing And this to be taken only for my last Will & Testament & none other. "And first being penitent & sorry from ye bottom of my heart for all my sinns past most humbly desiring forgivenesse for ye same I give & Comitt my soule unto Allmighty God my Saviour & Redeemer in whome & by ye
     Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland's Will.     55
meritts of Jesus Christ I trust & believe assuredly to be saved & to have full remission & forgivenesse of all my sins & that my Soule wt my Body at the generall Day of Resurrection shall rise againe wt Joy & through ye meritts of Christs Death & passion possesse & inheritt ye Kingdome of heaven prepared for his Elect & Chosen & my Body to be buryed in such place where it shall please my Executrs hereafter named to appoint And now for ye settling my temporall Estate & such goodes Chattells & Debts as it hath pleased God far above my Deserts to bestow upon me I Do Dispose order & give ye same in manner & forme following (That is to say) First that after my funerall Expences & Debts paid wc I owe either of right or in Conscience to any manner of person or persons whatsoever in Convenient tyme after my Decease by my Execrs hereafter named I Give & bequeath unto my Eldest Son John Howland ye sum of five pounds to be paid out of my Estate & my booke called Mr Tindale's Workes & also one pair of sheetes & one prof pillowbeeres & one pr of Bedblanketts, Item I give unto my son Joseph Howland my Stillyards & also one pr of sheetes & one pt of pillobeeres Item I give unto my son Jabez Howland my ffetherbed & boulster yt is in his Custody & also one Rugg & two Blanketts yt belongeth to ye said Bed & also my great Iron pott & potthookes Item I give unto my son Isaack Howland my Booke called Willson on ye Romanes & one pr of sheetes & one paire of pillowbeeres & also my great Brasse Kettle already in his possession Item I give unto my Son in Law Mr James Browne my great Bible Item I give & bequeath unto my Daughter Lidia Browne my best ffeatherbed & Boulster two pillowes & three Blanketts & a green Rugg & my small Cupboard one pr of AndyIrons & my lesser brasse Kettle & my small Bible & my booke of mr Robbinsons Workes called Observations Divine & Morrall & allso my finest pr of Sheetes & my holland pillowbeeres, Item I give unto my Daughter Elisabeth Dickenson one pr of Sheetes & one pr of pillowbeeres & one Chest Item give unto my Daughter Hannah Bosworth one pr of sheets & one pr of pillowbeeres, Item I give unto my Grand Daughter Elizabeth Bursley one paire of sheets and one paire of Pillowbeeres Item I give & bequeath unto my Grandson Nathanael Howland (the son of
56     Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland's Will     
Joseph Howland) and to the heires of his owne Body lawfully begotten for ever all that my Lott of Land with ye Meadow thereunto adjoyning & belonging lying in the Township of Duxbury neare Jones River bridge, Item I give unto my Grandson James Browne One Iron barr and on Iron Trammell now in his possession, Item I give unto my Grandson Jabez Browne one Chest Item I give unto my Grand Daughter Dorothy Browne My best Chest & my Warming pan Item I give unto my Grand Daughter Desire Cushman four Sheep, Item I give & bequeath my wearing clothes linnen and Woollen and all the rest of my Estate in mony Debts linnen or of what kind or nature or sort soever it may be unto my three Daughters Elisabeth Dickenson, Lidia Browne and Hannah Bosworth to be equally Devided amongst them, Item I make constitute and ordaine my loving Son in Law James Browne and my loving son Jabez Howland [p. 14] Executors of this my last Will and Testament, Item it is my Will & Charge to all my Children that they walke in ye Feare of ye Lord, and in Love and peace towards each other and endeavour the true performance of this my last Will & Testament In Witnesse whereof I the said Elisabeth Howland have hereunto sett my hand & seale this seventeenth Day of December Anno Dm one thousand six hundred Eighty & six.
The mark of Elisabeth E H Howland (sigittu)
Signed Sealed & Delivd
in ye prsence of Us Wittnesses
Hugh Cole
Samuel Vyall
John Browne
Know all men that on ye tenth Day of Janry Anno Dm 1687/8 Before me Nathanl Byfield Esqr Judge of his Majties Inferiour Court of Plea's for ye County of Bristoll, present Jno Walley Esqr one of ye Members of his Majties Councill in New England & Capt Benjam Church Justice of Peace The abovewritten Will of Elizabeth Howland was proved approved & allowed And ye Administracon of all & singuler ye goodes Rights and Creditts of ye said Deced was Committed unto James Browne & Jabez Howland Execrs in ye same Will named well & truly to Administer ye same according to the Will of ye Deced In Testimony whereof I have hereunto Sett ye Seale of ye Office for Probate of Wills & granting Lettrs of Admincon ye yeare & Day by me abovewritten
(Sigittu officij)     Nathanael Byfield
Thus Entred & ingrossed this 26: of Janry Anno Dm 1687/8 pr Steph Burton


6. She was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". She married John Howland on 25 March 1624 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.7 According to conflicting evidence, she married John Howland on 14 August 1623 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.8 Elizabeth died on 21 December 1687 at Swansea, Massachusetts, at age 80.9,10

Children of Elizabeth Tilley and John Howland

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 2;.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , PG 49;.
  3. [S50] Genealogical of MA, Cutter, William R. , pg 240,.
  4. [S82] TAG, Jacobus, Donald , vol 52 pg 203.
  5. [S566] Mayflower Quarterly, v. 57, #4, p. 342.
  6. [S335] Mayflower Desc. Leg., Mayflower CD.
  7. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 2.
  8. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 394.
  9. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6, MAYFLOWER PLANTERS PG. 21;.
  10. [S17] Howland Family, Howland, Franklyn , pg 323.

Desire Howland

F, b. circa 1625, d. 13 October 1683
     Desire was born circa 1625 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. Desire died on 13 October 1683 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.
  2. [S17] Howland Family, Howland, Franklyn , pg 323.

Jabez Howland

M, b. circa 1644
     Jabez was born circa 1644 at Rocky Nook, Kingston, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley.

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.

Joseph Howland

M, b. circa 1640
     Joseph was born circa 1640 at Rocky Nook, Kingston, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. He married Elizabeth Southworth on 7 December 1664.2,3,4

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos.
  3. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title."
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A.

Hope Howland1,2

F, b. 30 August 1629, d. 8 January 1683
     Hope was born on 30 August 1629 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.3 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. She married John Chipman circa 1645 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.4 Hope died on 8 January 1683 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, at age 53.1

Children of Hope Howland and John Chipman

Citations

  1. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry.
  2. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P.
  3. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A.

Elizabeth Howland

F, b. circa 1631
     Elizabeth was born circa 1631 at Maine.1 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley.

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.

Lydia Howland

F, b. circa 1633
     Lydia was born circa 1633 at Maine.1 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley.

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.

Hannah Howland

F, b. circa 1637
     Hannah was born circa 1637 at Maine.1 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley.

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.

Isaac Howland

F, b. 15 November 1649
     Isaac was born on 15 November 1649 at Rocky Nook, Kingston, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley.

Citations

  1. [S13] Howland, John, White, Elizabeth P. , pg 6.

John Tilley

M, b. before 19 December 1571 (chr., d. circa 1621
      Tilley
     
     
      The Surname Tilley is found in England as early as the Norman Conquest appears in Domesday Book. The name was common also in France and Holland at an early date and is doubtless of Norman-French origin. The name is spelled in ancient record Tillie, Tilly, Teley, Tiley, Tilee and Tely. We have at the present time the surname Tylee, probably of the Same English stock.
     
     
      Edward and John Tilley were among the passengers of the "Mayflower". Edward and his wife Ann both died in the spring of 1620-21. John brought his wife and daughter Elizabeth, and he and his wife also died early in 1621. The only descendants of these Pilgrim Tilleys are through John's daughter who married John Howland. No person of the name Tilley can claim descent through these ancestors in the male line.
     





























He was a silk worker. John was born before 19 December 1571 (chr. at Henlow, county Bedford, England. He was christened on 19 December 1571 at Henlow, county Bedford, England.1,2 He was the son of Robert Tilley and Elizabeth NN----. He married Joan Hurst on 20 September 1596 at Henlow, county Bedford, England.3,4,5 John Tilley was present at Rose Tilley's christening on 23 October 1597 at Henlow, county Bedford, England.2 He was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". John died circa 1621 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.6,2

Children of John Tilley and Joan Hurst

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 49,.
  2. [S82] TAG, Jacobus, Donald , vol 52 pg 203.
  3. [S82] TAG, Jacobus, Donald , vol 52 pg 204.
  4. [S565] Mayflower Quarterly, V. 57, #4, p. 342.
  5. [S630] TAG, Jacobus, Donald.
  6. [S17] Howland Family, Howland, Franklyn , pg 321,.

Thomas Rogers1,2

M, b. circa 1572, d. 1621
      Thomas Rogers Mayflower Familes through Five Generations Vol 2, pg 153
     
     
      "Little is known about Pilgrim Thomas Rogers and nothing at all is known about his ancestry. His alleged descent from John Rogers the Martyr was disproved in the 19th century by Joseph Chester and Henry F. Walters. Banks notes that taxpayers named Thomas Rogers, Christopher Martin and John Hooke appear in the London parish of St. Bartholomew the Great early in 1620, but there is no proof that these were the Mayflower passengers.
     
     
      Our earliest known encounter with Pilgrim Thomas Rogers was on 25 June 1618 when he became a citizen of Leiden, Holland, vouched for by William Jepson, formerly of Worksop, Notts., and by Roger Wilson, formerly of Sandwich, Kent Co. Engalnd. Banks therefore speculates that Rogers might have been from one of those towns. On 1 April 1620 Thomas sold his Leiden house on the Barbarasteeg for 300 guilders, in preparation for the journey to New England.
     
     
      Governor Bradford says in his history of the Plymouth settlement that on board the Mayflower were "Thomas Rogers and Joseph his son; his other children came afterwards......Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness but his son Joseph is still living (1650) and is married and hath six children. The rest of Thomas Rogers' [children] came over and are married and have many children." Therefore we know that Thomas and his son Joseph arrived at Cape Cod aboard the ship Mayflower and on 11 November 1620 according to their calendar, or 21 November on ours, Thomas was one of forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Thomas did not live through the rigorous winter which carried off half the group but young Joseph, like so many of the children, did survive.
     
     
      Recent discoveries show that Thomas had a family living in Leiden, Holland, when the 1622 Poll Tax was taken. In the Over "t Hoff Quarter, in a house with other Pilgrim families in St. Peter's Churchyard west-side, were Jan Thomas, orphan from England without means; Elsgen Rogiers, widow of Thonis Rogiers, an Englishwoman; and Lysbeth and Grietgen her children, poor people. Translated this could read John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children. At that period the word orphan meant that either or both parents were dead.
     
     
      In the 1623 Plymouth Colony land division, Joseph Rogers was allotted two acres-one for himself and one on behalf of his late father. He may have been living in the household of Governor Bradford with who he was grouped on 22 May 1627, in the division of cattle. Joseph and twelve other inhabitants of Plymouth received "an heyfer of the last year which was of the Great white-back cow that was brought over in the Ann and two shee goats."
     
     
      Governor Bradford's statement that the rest of Thomas Rogers' children came over and married and had children, seems clearly to indicate that more than one of his children came to New England after 1620. We know that his son John came to Plymouth about 1630. Although many other male Rogers immigrants have been claimed as sons of Thomas the Pilgrim, none of the claims has been proved and some have been disproved. Therefore it seems likely that at least one of the Rogers daughters who were living in Holland in 1622 came over. John and Joseph Rogers each named a daughter Elizabeth, perhaps thereby indicating that their sister Elizabeth lived in New England. Unfortunately extensive research has failed to uncover any further evidence.
     
     
      John Rogers came to Plymouth about 1630, when the last of the Leiden contingent arrived and was in Plymouth Colony on 25 March 1633 when he was taxed 9 shillings. The proof of his identity lies in a grant made 6 April 1640 to "Joseph Rogers and John Rogers his brother...fifty acres apeece of upland....at the North River." Both then had growing families to carry forward the Rogers heritage, although only Joseph's descendants would carry forward the Rogers name beyond the fourth generation."
      Thomas was born circa 1572 at Watford, Northamptonshire.3,1 He was the son of William Rogers and Eleanor NN----. He married Alice [Elsgen] Cosford before 24 October 1597 at Watford, Northamptonshire.4,1 Thomas Rogers, the father of Joseph Rogers, presented him for baptism on 23 January 1602 at Watford, Northamptonshire.1 Thomas Rogers, the father of John Rogers, presented him for baptism on 6 April 1606.1 Thomas Rogers, the father of Elizabeth or (Lysbeth) Rogers, presented her for baptism on 26 December 1609 at Watford, Northamptonshire.1 Thomas was employed at as a Merchant at Leyden, Holland, after 1610. He was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". Thomas died in 1621 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.5

Children of Thomas Rogers and Alice [Elsgen] Cosford

Citations

  1. [S329] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration Begins.
  2. [S342] Genealogist V.10 #2, Thomas Rogers Line.
  3. [S31] Rogers, Thomas, Sawtelle , entire book.
  4. [S31] Rogers, Thomas, Sawtelle , vol 2 pg 153 and 155.
  5. [S31] Rogers, Thomas, Sawtelle , pg 3.

Elizabeth (Elsgen) NN----

F, d. after 1622/23
     Elizabeth was born at England.1 Elizabeth died after 1622/23 at Leyden, Holland.1

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 2 pg 155.

Mary NN----

F
     Mary died. Mary was born.1 She married Andrew Hallett before 1608 at England.2,3

Children of Mary NN---- and Andrew Hallett

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , PG 475.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , PG 475,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 337.

Andrew Hallett

M, b. 1634
     Andrew was born.1
     
     
      Mr. Andrew Hallett, gentleman, was the ancestor of the Yarmouth and Barnstable families. He came over as early as the year 1637, and was of Plymouth March 1638. Respecting his family there is very little on record. His son Andrew was one of the first settlers of Sandwich. Another of his sons (Samuel) is named as being of Yarmouth in 1639. The Widow Mary Hallett of Barnstable, was probably his wife. Her daughter Hannah Hallet Married John Hadaway July 1656.
     
     
      Andrew was styled "gentleman," a title bestowed upon few in the Colony. It shows that he was a man possessed of a good estate, and a man of some note in his native land. He was among the very first who came to Mattakeset, but did not make it his place of residence till 1641.
     
     
      Mr. Hallett, as above stated was called a gentleman, a word that at that time had a very different meaning attached to it, than it has at the present time. When applied to a man, it meant that hew was connected with the gentry or wealthy class-that he was not a mechanic or common laborer, and that he had received a good education. Rank and title were more regard in those days than at the present time. Of the first settlers in Barnstable, about thirty were entitled to be called "goodman," four to be called "mister," and one "gentleman." What his employment was the records do not inform us. He was engaged in to many lawsuits for a teacher, yet Lechford was probably right. He had not been officially employed in the public service, yet the Colony Court decided that he had rendered some public service and was entitled to a liberal grant, and though objection was made the amount, yet the Court confirmed it, and the towns of Barnstable and Yarmouth acquiesced.
     
     "Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families"
     . He married Mary NN---- before 1608 at England.2,3 Andrew was born in 1634.4 Andrew immigrated to (an unknown value) in 1637.5

Children of Andrew Hallett and Mary NN----

Citations

  1. [S437] MICRO FSHE BOURNE.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , PG 475,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 337.
  4. [S44] Hudson-Mohawk, Reynolds, Cuyler , pg 1572.
  5. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 474.

Bathsheba Hallett

F, b. before 1615, d. 1670
     Bathsheba was born before 1615.1 She was the daughter of Andrew Hallett and Mary NN----. She married Richard Bourne before 1636 at Lynn or Sandwich, Massachusetts.2,3 Bathsheba died in 1670 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.4

Children of Bathsheba Hallett and Richard Bourne

Citations

  1. [S438] MICRO FSHE.
  2. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia ,,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 85.
  4. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.

Richard Bourne

M, b. circa 1610 (chr. date), d. 1682
     Richard Bourne
     
     
      "Aside from his labors as a missionary, Richard Bourne was a man of note. He was often a representative to the General Court; held many town offices; often served on committees, as a referee in important cases. He was a well-informed, discreet, cautious, of sound judgment, and of good common sense. There is reason to doubt whether he brought to New England so large an estate as has been represented. The division of the meadows at Sandwich does not indicate that he was a man of wealth. He was a good business man, and while he carefully guarded the interests of the Indians, he did not forget to lay up treasures for himself.
     
     
      John Eliot, Thomas Mayhew, father and son, Richard Bourne, John Cotton, Daniel Gookin, and Thomas Tupper consecrated their lives to the philanthropic purpose of meliorating the condition of the Indians. They instructed them in the arts of civilized life; they established schools, and they founded churches. Many of the Indians were converted to Christianity, and lived pious and holy lives; very many of them were taught to read and write their native language, and were good English scholars.
     
     
      Mr. Bourne was the pastor of the Indian Church at Marshpee (Massape) gathered in 1670. The apostles Eliot and Cotton assisted at his ordination. His parish extended from Provincetown to Middleboro, one hundred miles. He commenced his labors as a missionary about the year 1658, and in his return to Major Gookin, dated Sandwich, Sept. 1, 1674, he says he is the only Englishman employed in this extensive region. and the results of his labors are stated in his return. of which the following is a condensed abstract:
     
     
      "Praying Indians that do frequently meet together on the Lord's Day to worship God." He names twenty-two places where meeting were held. The number of men and women that attended these meetings was three hundred and nine. Young men and maids, one hundred and eight-eight. Of these one hundred and forty-two could read the Indian language, seventy-two could write, and nine could read English.
     
     
      The labors of Mr. Bourne and his associates have not been sufficiently appreciated by historians. In 1675, the far-seeing Philip, Sachem of Mount Hope, had succeeded in uniting the Western Indians in a league, the avowed object whereof was the extermination of the white inhabitants of New England. His emissaries in vain attempted to induce the Christianized Indians to join that league. They remained faithful. Richard Bourne, aided by Thomas Tupper of Sandwich, Mr. Thornton of Yarmouth and Mr. Treat of Eastham had a controlling influence over the numerous bands of Indians then resident in the County of Barnstable, in Wareham, Rochester, and Middleboro'. Mr. Mayhew elected a like controlling influence over the natives of Martha's Vineyard and the adjacent islands.
     
     
      In 1674, the year preceding King Philip's war, the returns made to Major
Gookin, show that the aggregate number of Christianized or praying Indians.
     
     __________In Massachusetts, was________________1100
     __________In Plymouth, Mr Bourne's return_______497
     __________In Plymouth, Mr. Cotton's partial_______40
      Estimated number not enumerated, 170
      On Martha's Vineyard and Chappaquidock 1500
      On Natucket, 300
      _____________
      3607
     
     
      It is not to be presumed that, at that time, more than one-half of the Indians had been converted, or were nominally Christians. Perhaps a fair estimate of the Indian population in 1675, in the territory comprised in the eastern part of the present State of Massachusetts, would be 7000; one-fifth, or 1400 if were warriors.
     
     
      On account of the jealousies and suspicions entertained by the English in Massachusetts, the Indians rendered little service to the whites. Mr. Eliot and Major Gookin suffered reproaches and insults fro endeavoring to repress the popular rage against their pupils. Some of the praying Indians of Natick, and from other places in Massachusetts, were transported to Deer Island in Boston harbor. Some of the Indians in Plymouth colony, particularly those at Pembroke, were conveyed to Clarke's Island, Plymouth.
     
     
      On Martha's Vineyard and on the Cape, the Indians were friendly to the English. Many enlisted and fought bravely against the forces of Philip. Capt. Daniel of Satucket, (Brewster), and Capt. Amos distinguished themselves in the war and are honorably mentioned. In the course of the war, the number of prisoners became embarrassing, and they were sent to the Cape and Martha's vineyard, and were safely kept by the friendly Indians.
     
     
      Major Walley says that the English were rarely successful when they were not aided by Indian auxiliaries, and urges this as a reason for treating them kindly. The reader of the "History of the Indian Wars" will find many facts to corroborate the opinion of Major Walley.
     
     
      In the spring of 1676 the armies of Philip were victorious, and the inhabitants of Plymouth Colony were panic stricken and despondent. If at that time the one thousand Indian warriors, who were influenced and controlled by Bourne and Mayhew had become enemies, the contest in Plymouth Colony would not have been doubtful, the other towns would have been destroyed and met the fate of Dartmouth, Middleboro, and Swanzey. At this time three hundred men could not be raised to march for the defense of Rehobeth. All the towns, excepting Sandwich and Scituate, raised their quotas; but many of the soldiers that went forth, returned to their homes without marching to the defense of their frontier towns.
     
     
      In 1675, Gov. Hinckley enumerated the Christianized Indians embraced in the region of country which had been under the superintendence of Mr. Bourne. The number had increased from four hundred and ninety-seven in 1674, to ten hundred and fourteen in 1685. Showing that in a period of eleven years the number had more than doubled.
     
     
      In 1676, no enumeration of the Indians was made; but it is within the bounds of probability to assume that in the district of country under the supervision and care of Mr. Bourne there were at least six hundred Indian warriors. Had these at this particular conjecture turned rebels, the whites could not have defended their towns and villages against the savages, and Plymouth Colony would have become extinct.
     
     
      It may be urged that Mr. Bourne could not have done this unaided and alone; or, if he had not, God in his providence would have raised up some other instruments to have effected this great purpose. The fact is Richard Bourne by his unremitting labors for seventeen years made friends of a sufficient number of Indians, naturally hostile to the English, to turn the scale in Plymouth Colony and give the preponderance to the whites. He did this , and it is to him who does, that we are to award honor. Bourne did more by the moral power which he exerted to defend the Old Colony than Bradford did at the head of the army. Laurel wreaths shade the brows of military heroes- thir names are enshrined in bright halo of glory-while the man who has done good service for his country by means, sinks into comparative insignificance, and is to often forgotten.
     
     
      The Apostle Eliot, Mr. Mayhew, and other missionaries, performed like meritorious services. The people of Massachusetts were more suspicious of the food faith of the converted Indians, than the residents in the Plymouth Colony. These Indians were treated unkindly by the English, yet a company from Natick proved faithful, and did good service in the war.
     
     
      Of the early history of Mr. Richard Bourne little is known. It is said he came from Devonshire, England. He was a hoseholder in Plymouth in 1636, and his name appears on the list of freemen of the Colony, dated March 7, 1636-7. On the 2nd of January preceding, seven acres of land were granted to him to belong to his dwelling-house. At the same court seven acres of land were granted to John Bourne, in behalf of his father, Mr. Thomas Bourne.
     
     
      May 2, 1637 he was on a jury to lay out the highways about Plymouth, Duxbury and Eel River. June 5, 1638, he was a grand juror, and also a member of a coroner's inquest. On the 4th of September following, he was an inhabitant of Sandwich, and fined 18 pence for having three pigs unringed. He was a deputy to the first general court in 1639, and excepting 1643, represented the town of Sandwich till 1645; again in 1652, 1664, 65, 66, 67, and 70.
     
     
      AT a General Court held at Plymouth June 4, 1661, the Court granted unto Richard Bourne of Sandwich, and to his heirs forever, a long strip of land on the west side of Pampasised river, where Sandwich men take alewives-in breadth from the river to the hill or ridge that runs along the length of it, from a point of rocky land by a swamp called Pametoopauksett, unto a place called by the English Muddy Hole, by the Indians Wapoompauksett."
     
     
      Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families
by Amos Otis
     . Richard was born circa 1610 (chr. date) at Devonshire Count, England. He was christened in 1610 at Devonshire Count, England.1 He was the son of William Bourne and Ursula Day. He married Bathsheba Hallett before 1636 at Lynn or Sandwich, Massachusetts.2,3 He married Ruth Sargent on 2 July 1677 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2,3 Richard died in 1682 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.1

Children of Richard Bourne and Bathsheba Hallett

Citations

  1. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.
  2. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia ,,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 85.

William Bourne

M, b. 1589, d. 1634
     He married Ursula Day.1 William was born in 1589 at Devonshire, England.1 He was the son of William Bourne and Mary Morris. William Bourne was present at Richard Bourne's christening in 1610 at Devonshire Count, England.1 William died in 1634 at Devonshire, England.1

Child of William Bourne and Ursula Day

Citations

  1. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.

Ursula Day

F
     She married William Bourne.1 Ursula was born.1 She was present at Richard Bourne's christening in 1610 at Devonshire Count, England.1

Child of Ursula Day and William Bourne

Citations

  1. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.

Elisha Bourne

M, b. 1641, d. 1706
     Elisha was born in 1641 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Richard Bourne and Bathsheba Hallett. He married Patience Skiff on 26 October 1675. Elisha died in 1706 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2

Children of Elisha Bourne and Patience Skiff

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 111.
  2. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.

Shearjashub Bourne

M, b. 1644, d. 7 March 1719/20
     Shearjashub was born in 1644 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Richard Bourne and Bathsheba Hallett. Shearjashub died on 7 March 1719/20 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 111.
  2. [S27] Bourne Family, Brownson, Lydia.

Ezra Bourne

M, b. 12 May 1648
     Ezra was born on 12 May 1648 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Richard Bourne and Bathsheba Hallett.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 111.

Arthur Warren

M, d. 6 July 1658
     Arthur was born.1
     
     
      While the history of the Warren family in Europe is not complete in every detail, there are certain facts of interest which seem to be fairly authentic. There is no doubt that the name dates back to the early history of France and England and has been born by some of their most illustrious sons. Good authority also exists for believing that members of this family have formed alliances through marriage with ruling houses of both of these countries.
     
     
      This family name comes doubtless from the Latin word Guarenna or Varenna, of which the primary sense is to stop, hold or repel, to guard or keep off. This word in Norman French became Guarenne or Varenne and is sometimes written Guaren or Guarin in old documents. It is likewise found in English as Warren, Warrene, Waren, Warrin, Warin, or Waring. The name Varneene was given both to a river in the County of Calais, Normandy and to the country bordering on this stream. This region, while not large in area, apparently was of sufficient political importance in the 11th century to bring to its processor the title of Earl or Count.
     
     
      The first to bear this title was William de St. Martins, so called from his birthplace, who received the fief of Varenne from Duke William II of Normandy. He lived in the 11th century and was without doubt a descendant from the stock of the Danish invaders. There is considerable data extant, though unfortunately much of it is legendary, which would connect him directly with the warrior chieftain of the Northmen, Rolf or Rollo, who force from King Charles III of France the grant of the northern section of that country, then called Neustria. The new owners changed the name to Normandy and their leader became the first Duke of Normandy. It is from this dual lineage that the first Earl of Warren, or Comte de Guaren or Varrenne, is said to have sprung. History bears eloquent testimony that he was a worthy recipient of this new title, as he served his sovereign nobly at home and abroad.
     
     
      The first mention of this name in English history is in connection with the Battle of Hastings, fought in 1066. In this conflict one of Duke William's most trusted lieutenants was Comte de Guaren, or the 2nd Earl Warren. He must have been in high favor at court, for he later became the husband of Gundred, the daughter of the Conqueror in whose train he had come to England. At Domesday, he received 298 manors as his share of the kingdom for the part played in the victories of Hastings and Ely and was rated as the richest subject in England. In 1073 he was appointed one of the Grand Judiciaries of England and was created Early of Surrey by William Rugus in 1088. Both he and his wife seem to have been of a generous disposition as they gave the money for the establishment, at Lewes in Sussex County, of one of the most magnificent Priories in England, and assisted liberally the other churches and monasteries in the counties subject to them. Their last years were passed in the principal castle at Lewes and they were buried in the Chapter House of the Priory which they had endowed.
     
     
      The line of nobility thus established existed with distinction until the reign of Edward III when the estates and title were surrendered to the crown by John, 8th Earl Warren, who died without male issue in 1347. The King made grants of the lands thus surrendered but took no notice of the title. In fact it was not until more than a century later that the title was again used, being conferred upon the son of the Duke of Norfolk who was created Earl of Warren and Surrey by Henry VI. As he left no male issue the title reverted to the crown. It was not conferred again until 1476, when Richard, Duke of York, son-in-law of the previous holder, was created by Edward VI Duke of Norfolk and Earl of Warren. He also died without male issue and the earldom became once more unenjoyed. It has not been granted to anyone since and, therefore, is extinct, though the title Earl of Surrey is a possession of the noble family of Howard. Through marriage the Warren family was later allied with the houses of Wirmgay and Poynton. From this latter branch came the William Warren who settled in Caunton, Notts Co., England, in the 15th century and was (probably) an ancestor of Arthur Warren who emigrated to America about 1635. Though this last statement is not established beyond question, yet Joch C. Warren, Esq,of Nottingham, Eng., who has made a study of this family, writes as follows: "One notable thing is that Arthur was not a common Warren name. Indeed I cannot find it used in old days among any branch of the family except the Leicester and Notts Warrens.
     
     
      The physiognomy of various descendants of Arthur Warren clearly showed traces of a French Ancestry.
     
     
      Arthur Warren undoubtedly emigrated from England to New England about 1635, though diligent and repeated efforts have failed to discover the date and place of his birth or the exact time when he came to this country. However, it is known that he settled in Weymouth, Ma. Bay Colony, before 1638. In that year he married Mary _____. At the Quarter Court held in Boston December 7, 1641 he was a witness in the case against Walthian Richards. In the list of the real estate owned by the various proprietors of the plantation of Weymouth, made between Oct. 26, 1642 and May 21, 1644 "the land of Arthure Warren" is described as follows: "Tenn acres of upland and swamp, first fiven to himselfe, bounded on the East with Mr. Gloveres marsh, on the west and south with Mr. Barnardes land, on the north by the sea. "Tenn acres in the Mill-field, given to himselfe, bounded on the east and south with Hingham line, on the north with the land of Walter Harris, the common on the west." In 1645, Arthur Waring joined with about 20 members of the church in Braintree in a petition to the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony "for a grant of the Narragansett lands supposed to have been rendered forfeit by the heresy of Gorton, Holden and the others, just proprietors. At a meeting of the Townsmen certain lands be divided.
     . Arthur immigrated to (an unknown value) circa 1635. He married Mary NN---- before 1639 at Weymouth, Norfolk County, Massachusetts.2,3 Arthur died on 6 July 1658.

Children of Arthur Warren and Mary NN----

Citations

  1. [S439] SOME DESCENDANTS OF ARTHUR WARREN PG7-8.
  2. [S530] Genealogies of Woodstock Families pg 26,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 781.