Samuel White

M, b. 13 March 1646/47
     Samuel was born on 13 March 1646/47 at Scituate, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Resolved White and Judith Vassall.

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 101.

Resolved White

M, b. 12 November 1647
     Resolved died. Resolved was born on 12 November 1647 at Scituate, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Resolved White and Judith Vassall. His body was interred on 27 March 1671 at Marshfield, Massachusetts.1

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 101.

Anna White

F, b. 4 June 1649
     Anna was born on 4 June 1649 at Scituate, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Resolved White and Judith Vassall.

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 101.

Josiah White

M, b. 29 September 1654
     Josiah was born on 29 September 1654 at Scituate, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Resolved White and Judith Vassall.

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 101.

Susannah White

F, b. August 1656
     Susannah was born in August 1656 at Scituate, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Resolved White and Judith Vassall.

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 101.

William White

M, d. 21 February 1621/22
     William was a wool carder. William was born at prob. England.1 He married Susanna NN---- on 1 July 1612 at Leyden, Holland.2,3 He was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". William died on 21 February 1621/22 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.1

Children of William White and Susanna NN----

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 99.
  2. [S1] White, William, White, Thomas , pg 16,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 807.

Susanna NN----

F, d. circa 1654
     Susanna was born at prob. England.1
     
      It has been speculated that Susanna was this sister of Samuel and Edward
     Fuller of the "Mayflower", but has not been proven.
     
     
      "THE MAYFLOWER"
     
     
      The English ship the Mayflower carried the Separatist Puritans, later known as Pilgrims, to Plymouth, Mass., in 1620. The 180-ton vessel was about 12 years old and had been in the wine trade. It was chartered by John Carver, a leader of the Separatist congregation at Leiden, Holland, who had gone to London to make arrangements for the voyage to America. The ship was made ready at Southampton with a passenger list that included English Separatist, hired help (among them Myles Standish, a professional soldier and John Alden, a cooper) and other colonists who were to be taken along at the insistence of the London businessmen who were helping to finance the expedition.
     
     
      In the meantime the Leiden Separatist who had initiated the venture sailed for Southampton on July 22, 1620 with 35 members of the congregation and their leaders William Bradford and William Brewster aboard the 60-ton Speedwell. Both the Speedwell and the Mayflower carrying a total of about 120 passengers, sailed from Southampton on August 15 but they were twice forced back by dangerous leaks on the Speedwell. At the English port of Plymouth some of the Speedwell's passengers were regrouped on the Mayflower and on September 16th the historic voyage began.
     
     
      This time the Mayflower carried 102 passengers, only 37 of whom were from the Leiden congregation, in addition to the crew. The voyage took 65 days, during which two persons died. A boy, Oceanus Hopkins, was born at sea and another Peregrine White, was born as the ship lay at anchor off Cape Cod. The ship came in sight of Cape Cod on November 19 and sailed south. The colonists had been granted territory in Virginia but probably headed for a planned destination near the mouth of the Hudson River. The Mayflower turned back, however, and dropped anchor at Provincetown on November 21. That day 41 men signed the so-called Mayflower Compact, a "plantation covenant" modeled after a Separatist church covenant, by which they agreed to establish a "Civil Body Politic" (a temporary government) and to be bound by its laws. This agreement was thought necessary because there were rumors that some of the non-Separatists, called "Strangers," among the passengers would defy the Pilgrims if they landed in a place other than the specified in the land grant they received from the London Company. The compact became the basis of government in the Plymouth Colony. After it was signed, the Pilgrims elected John Carver their first Governor.
     
     
      After weeks of scouting for a suitable settlement area, the Mayflower's passengers finally landed at Plymouth on December 26, 1620.
     
     
      Although the Mayflower's captain and part-owner Christopher Jones, had threatened to leave the Pilgrims unless they quickly found a place to land, the ship remained at Plymouth during the first terrible winter of 1620-21, when half of the colonists died.
     
     
      The Mayflower left Plymouth on April 15, 1621 and arrived back in England on May 16.
     
     
      William Bradford's classic account of the Mayflower's voyage does not mention the ship by name, nor does it describe the vessel. In 1926, however, a model was constructed by R.C. Anderson from general information about late-16th-century merchant ships of its tonnage. This model, which is in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, gives the ship's dimensions as 90 ft (27.4m) long, with a 64-ft (19.5m) keel, 26-ft (7.9m) beam and a hold 11 ft (3.4m) deep. In 1957 a close replica of the Mayflower was sailed from Plymouth, England, to Plymouth, Mass., where it is on view.
     
     
      THE MAYFLOWER COMPACT
     
      NOVEMBER 11, 1620
     
     
      "IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. WE WHOSE NAMES ARE UNDERWRITTEN, THE LOYAL SUBJECTS OF OUR DREAD SOVEREIGN LORD KING JAMES, BY THE GRACE OF GOD, OF GREAT BRITAIN, FRANCE, AND IRELAND, KING, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, AND HAVING UNDERTAKEN FOR THE GLORY OF GOD, AND ADVANCEMENT OF THE CHRISTIAN FAITH, AND THE HONOR OF OUR KING AND COUNTRY, A VOYAGE TO PLANT THE FIRST COLONY IN THE NORTHERN PARTS OF VIRGINIA; DO BY THESE PRESENTS, SOLEMNLY AND MUTUALLY IN THE PRESENCE OF GOD AND ONE ANOTHER, COVENANT AND COMBINE OURSELVES TOGETHER INTO A CIVIL BODY POLITICK, FOR OUT BETTER ORDERING AND PRESERVATION, AND FURTHERANCE OF THE ENDS AFORESAID; AND BY VIRTUE HEREOF DO ENACT, CONSTITUTE, AND FRAME, SUCH JUST AND EQUAL LAWS, ORDINANCE, ACTS, CONSTITUTIONS, AND OFFICES, FROM TIME TO TIME, AS SHALL BE THOUGHT MOST MEET AND CONVENIENT FOR THE GENERAL GOOD OF THE COLONY; UNTO WHICH WE PROMISE ALL DUE SUBMISSION AND OBEDIENCE. IN WITNESS WHEREOF WE HAVE HEREUNTO SUBSCRIBED OUR NAMES AT CAPE COD THE ELEVENTH OF NOVEMBER, IN THE REIGN OF OUR SOVEREIGN LORD KING JAMES OF ENGLAND, FRANCE, AND IRELAND, THE EIGHTEENTH AND OF SCOTLAND, THE FIFTY-FOURTH. ANNO DOMINI, 1620
     
Mr. John Carver
     Mr. Stephen Hopkins
     Mr. William Bradford
     Digery Priest
     Mr. Edward Winslow
     Thomas Williams
     Mr. William Brewster
     Gilbert Winslow
     Isaac Alerton
     Edmund Margesson
     Miles Standish
     Peter Brown
     John Alden
     Richard Bitteridge
     John Turner
     George Soule
     Francis Eaton
     Edward Tilly
     James Chilton
     John Tilly
     John Craxton
     Francis Cooke
     John Billington
     Thomas Rogers
     Joses Gletcher
     Thomas Tinker
     John Goodman
     John Ridgate
     Mr. Samuel Fuller
     Edward Fuller
     Mr. Christopher Martin
     Richard Clark
     Mr. William Mullins
     Richard Gardiner
     Mr. William White
     Mr. John Allerton
     Mr. Richard Warren
     Thomas English
     John Howland
     Edward Doten
     Edward Liester.

She was the daughter of NN---- NN----. She married William White on 1 July 1612 at Leyden, Holland.2,3 She was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". Susanna died circa 1654.1

Children of Susanna NN---- and William White

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 99.
  2. [S1] White, William, White, Thomas , pg 16,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 807.

William Vassall1

M, b. 27 August 1592, d. 1655
      William Vassall the first of his name who came to this country, was assistant in the Massachusetts Bay Company, and one of the original patentees of New England lands. At a formal meeting of the governor and company held October 15, 1629, he with others, was appointed "to go over," and in the next year he arrived in this country, but returned after a short stay, in the ship "Lyon" In Jun, 1635, he embarked with wife and six children on board the "Blessing," for New England was among the number who came into Scituate in 1634-1635, although the was not a member of Mr. Lothrop's church. He was a man of considerable fortune and of some importance both in England and in the Massachusetts Colony. A most beautiful tract of land on the river was granted him, by far the largest tract allotted to any one settler. It contained more than 150 acres and Vassall began at once his plantation, which he called "West Newland." The house that he built in 1635 upon the beautiful slope of uplands, commanding a glorious view of the rising sun across fern meadows was named "Belle House." It served its name most truly from its outlook.
     
     
      William and Samuel Vassall were original patentees of New England lands. They were sons of John Vassall, an alderman of London, a man of great wealth, who in 1588 fitted out and commanded two vessels which he gave to the British Navy, to help oppose the Spanish Armada. William and Samuel were officers of the Massachusetts Company in London. It is said that Samuel at one time was the owner of the Mayflower. His monument in King's Chapel, Boston was erected in 1766 by his great grandson. He never came to New England but removed early to Barbados.
     
     
      William Vassall was one of Craddock's assistants at the time that he was made acting Governor of the Massachusetts Company in London and John Endicott had been sent to govern affairs on this side. His first direct knowledge of Massachusetts lands was in 1630 when he came to New England with John Winthrop, returning to London in the Ship Lyon in 1631. He was on this side of the Atlantic when complaints were made by the colonists against Endicott's government and the settlers chose him and his brother Samuel as their referees to present their petition to Craddock in England. He must have been favorably impressed by the probable future of the colonies for he returned in June 1635, embarking with his wife and six children in the ship "Blessing" with the intention of making a home in the new lands toward the west. Leaving his family in Roxbury, he erected his home upon his new plantation, "West Newland", the year of his arrival. He found Scituate a home greatly to his liking and became a member of Mr. Lothrop's church. While there was more or less controversy in the church during the next three or four years, Mr. Vassall seems to have taken little active part in it. He was a well educated man, and had thought deeply on matters that were causing religious disagreement both in England and in the Colonies.
     
     
      When the Reverend Charles Chauncey was settled as Mr. Lothrop's successor in 1641. Mr. Vassall soon found himself in great disfavor with his new pastor who would endure no opposition to views that he felt his talents and learning should make acceptable to his parishioners without too much questioning on their part. Mr. Vassall's powers of persuasive argument may have been quite as much in his disfavor as the ideas that he entertained for he was quite the equal of his new pastor in religious argument and drew to his opinions many other church members as well as a number of new settlers who were taking up lands upon the river. The "Second Church of Christ" in Scituate was formed in Vassall's house on February 2, 1642.
     
     
      William Vassall had much to do with public affairs in the town. The earliest records extant are in his beautiful handwriting and that of Edward Foster as no town Clerk was appointed until 1636. He held no office in the Colonial Government, perhaps by his disinclination, but more likely because his opinions, both religious and social were greatly in advance of his time. In this relation, Deane says: "It is worthy of remark that most of the principles held by such men as Cudworth, Hatherly, Vassall and Roger Williams, for which they suffered the persecutions of the early Colonial Governments were such principles of civil and religious liberty as are now recognized to be the truest and best."
     
     
      Once embroiled in controversy, Mr. Vassal's argumentative disposition kept him in more or less trouble for the next few years. He espoused the cause of the people of Hingham in their protest against a decision of the court relative to their choice of a captain of the town militia and in 1646 was sent to Engalnd as one of their emissaries to present this protest to the government there. He met with no success on his errand and finding himself out of sympathy with colonial leaders, joined his brother Samuel in Barbadoes in 1648, without returning to Scituate. He died in the Parish of St. Michael's in 1655, leaving a will in which his son, Capt. John Vassall was named executor.
     
     
      After Jamaica was taken by the British, the Vassalls made large fortunes in Barbadoes. The family life in St. Michael's was one of lavish magnificence, combined with the crudest service. English visitors were shocked by the attire of the negro servants who waited on tables loaded with silver plate, in the scantiest of clothing and that often in tatters.
     
     
      All the Vassalls were Loyalists and fled the country with the British forces when Boston was evacuated. Their properties were confiscated and sold and some of them died in poverty. The Vassall house at Belle House Neck, Scituate purchased in 1662 by John Cushing is said to have been neither large nor imposing but it housed the Cushings of three generations and was the birthplace of Chief Justice William in 1732. In 1742, Judge John Cushing, 2d, built the house now standing on the property, the home of Roger Sherman Dix. It was owned by the descendants of John Cushing, fourth of the name; elder half brother of Judge William, until its sale in 1842 to David Briggs from whose son it was purchased by Mr. Dix.
     
     ______ Ashleys of the Old Colony, pages xxix-xxxii.
William was born on 27 August 1592.2 He was baptized on 27 August 1592. He was the son of John Vassall and Anne Russell. William applied for a marriage license to wed Ann King on 9 June 1613 at Cold Norton, county Essex, England.3,4,5 He married Ann King circa 1613 at Cold Norton, county Essex, England.6 William died in 1655 at Barbadoes.7

Children of William Vassall and Ann King

Citations

  1. [S329] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration Begins.
  2. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry , pg 470.
  3. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 99;.
  4. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry , pg 470,.
  5. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 766.
  6. [S232] NEHGR Volume XVII, (1863).
  7. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry , pg470.

Ann King1,2

F, b. circa 1593
     Ann died. Ann was born circa 1593 at Cold Norton, county Essex, England. She was the daughter of George King. Ann applied for a marriage license to wed William Vassall on 9 June 1613 at Cold Norton, county Essex, England.3,4,5 She married William Vassall circa 1613 at Cold Norton, county Essex, England.6 Ann immigrated to (an unknown value) in July 1635.7

Children of Ann King and William Vassall

Citations

  1. [S161] Winthrop Fleet, Banks, Charles E.
  2. [S70] NEHGR, "unknown short article title."
  3. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 99;.
  4. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry , pg 470,.
  5. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 766.
  6. [S232] NEHGR Volume XVII, (1863).
  7. [S79] Pioneers of MA, Pope, Charles Henry , pg 470.

Peregrine White

M, b. December 1620, d. 22 July 1704
      Recognition of Peregrine as the first English child born in New England was given on 11 October 1655 when "in Respect that he was the first of the English that was borne in these parts. The Court have granted unto him two hundred Acres of Land Lying and being at the Path that goes from Bridgewater to the bay adjoining to the Bay line."

      "Marshfield, July 22, 1704, Captain Peregrine White of this town aged eighty three years, and eight months; died the 20th instant. He was vigorous and of a comly aspect to the last. Altho' he was in the former part of his life extravagant; yet was much reformed in his last years and died hopefully."
      [Boston News-Letter]
     
Peregrine was born in December 1620 at born on the Mayflower.1 He was the son of William White and Susanna NN----. Peregrine White On 6 March 1648/49 Peregrine White, born on the Mayflower, and his wife Sarah, both of Marshfield, were fined for fornication before marriage.

Peregrine died on 22 July 1704 at Marshfield, Massachusetts, at age 83.1

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 1 pg 99.

NN---- NN----

M
     NN---- died.

Child of NN---- NN----

Leona Pearl Brown

F, b. 28 June 1886, d. 24 January 1980
     She married Burette Ezell Nolen. Leona was born on 28 June 1886.1 She was the daughter of Charles Ellsworth Brown and Rosaline Melcima Surrells. Leona Pearl Brown died on 24 January 1980 at Broward, FL, at age 93.

Child of Leona Pearl Brown and Burette Ezell Nolen

Citations

  1. [S371] Census, Robinson Twp., Crawford Co. IL 1900.

Dora Brown1

F, b. May 1892
Dora Brown
ca. 1930
     She married Jack Eggert. Dora was born in May 1892.2 She was the daughter of Charles Ellsworth Brown and Rosaline Melcima Surrells.

Citations

  1. [S628] Burgess Genealogy, Marvin, T.R. , p. 198.
  2. [S371] Census, Robinson Twp., Crawford Co. IL 1900.

Henry P. Miller

M, b. 6 August 1853, d. 15 October 1932
     Henry was born on 6 August 1853 at Trenton Falls, New York.1 He was the son of Harry H. Miller and Angeline Bates. He married Harriett Mills on 1 January 1883 at Marathon, New York.2 Henry died on 15 October 1932 at Cortland, Cortland, New York, at age 79.

Children of Henry P. Miller and Harriett Mills

Citations

  1. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6.
  2. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6, M/C Marathon.

Harriett Mills1

F, b. 15 September 1863, d. 5 July 1943
     Harriett was born on 15 September 1863 at Michigan.2,3 She was the daughter of Ranslaer Mills and Caroline Clark. Harriett Mills was Protestant - Methodist. She married Henry P. Miller on 1 January 1883 at Marathon, New York.4 Harriett died on 5 July 1943 at Cortland, Cortland, New York, at age 79.5,6

Obituary of Harriet Mills - 1943
     
      Rites Wednesday for Mrs. Miller at Cortland Home

     
     
      Cortland Mrs. Harriet Miller, 79 widow of Henry Miller, died Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. T.H. Ashley, 94 Greenbush St. where she had lived for many years.
     
      Mrs. Miller,
was born September 15, 1863, in Michigan. Her father, Rensslaeler Mills, was a civil war veteran and her mother was Caroline Mills. Her parents moved from Homer to Michigan after her father's return from the war.
     
      For more than 50 years Mrs. Miller had lived in Cortland and was an active member of First Methodist church. One of the oldest members of that church, she taught a Sunday school class for more than 25 years. Her name was the first signed to the Women's Society for Christian Service. Her husband died 11 years ago in Cortland.
     
      Surviving are a son, Carrol H. Miller, of Binghamton: two daughters, Mrs. A.F. Russell, of Tuckahoe; and Mrs. T.H. Ashley of Cortland, several grandchildren and one great-grandchild, Glyndon H. Crocker III.
     
     
      Services will be held privately at 2:30pm, Wednesday at the home. Friends may call Tuesday evening, burial will be in the Glenwood Cemetery, Homer.
     
     

Children of Harriett Mills and Henry P. Miller

Citations

  1. [S282] Mills, Harriet Obit, Mills, Harriet Obit.
  2. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6,.
  3. [S223] Mills, 1880 Census Cortland.
  4. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6, M/C Marathon.
  5. [S282] Mills, Harriet Obit, Mills, Harriet Obit , Cortland Standard.
  6. [S590] Unknown volume, Mills, Harriett (DC): DC Cortland NY, 5 July 1943, unknown repository.

Mabel Miller

F, b. 29 May 1886, d. 21 October 1962
     Mabel was born on 29 May 1886 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.1 She was the daughter of Henry P. Miller and Harriett Mills.
      Mable Miller, attended Cortland High School and was graduated from Cortland State Normal School in 1909. She taught at Huntington, Long Island where she was Supervisor of Music and Drawing for three years. She then taught in Yonkers, New York and Tuckahoe, New York.
She married Andrew Francis Russell before 1918. Mabel died on 21 October 1962 at Homer, Cortland County, New York, at age 76.

Children of Mabel Miller and Andrew Francis Russell

Citations

  1. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6.

Carrol H. Miller

M, b. 23 January 1885
     Carrol was born on 23 January 1885 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.1 He was the son of Henry P. Miller and Harriett Mills. Carrol Miller, attended Cortland State Normal School and was graduated from Albany Business College. He was an auditor in the Marine Midland Bank of Binghamton. He married Edith Shaffer circa 1918.

Child of Carrol H. Miller and Edith Shaffer

Citations

  1. [S151] Census 1900, Cortland, NY , Dis. 93 SH. B6.

Harry H. Miller

M, b. 1814, d. 29 November 1871
Not Harry's group, but what it most likely looked like.
     Harry was born in 1814 at Herkimer, Herkimer County, New York.1 He married Angeline Bates before 1841.1 Harry H. Miller began military service on 22 August 1862 at Company H, 157th Regiment, Homer, Cortland, NY. Harry died on 29 November 1871.

Children of Harry H. Miller and Angeline Bates

Citations

  1. [S150] Census 1855, Cortland, NY , HO-399.

Angeline Bates

F, b. circa 1822, d. 15 December 1889
     Angeline was born circa 1822 at Cortland, Cortland, New York.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Bates and Amelia "Millie" Babcock. She married Harry H. Miller before 1841.1 Angeline died on 15 December 1889 at Homer, Cortland, NY. She was buried in 1889 at Glenwood Cemetery, Homer, Cortland, NY; Glenwood Cemetery, Cortland Co., Homer, NY: MILLER Angeline wife of Henry H. d. December 15 , 1889 aged 68 yrs; lot 52 sec 12.

Children of Angeline Bates and Harry H. Miller

Citations

  1. [S150] Census 1855, Cortland, NY , HO-399.

Ranslaer Mills

M, b. circa __ ___ 1821-1824, d. 17 December 1884
     Ranslaer was born circa __ ___ 1821-1824 at Herkimer, Herkimer County, New York.1,2 He married Caroline Clark in 1859 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.3 Ranslaer Mills began military service on 13 January 1864 at Herkimer, New York,
Ranslaer Mills
     
     Residence:          Occupation:     
     Service Record:          
     Enlisted as a Private on 13 January 1864 at the age of 39
Enlisted in Company A, 16th Heavy Artillery Regiment New York on 13 January 1864.
Mustered out Company A, 16th Heavy Artillery Regiment New York on 21 August 1865 in Washington, DC
The 16th NY Artillery, Companies B, D, and F
The Artillery Representation of Herkimer County


From "History of Herkimer County, New York" by F.W. Beers & Co., New York. 1879
This regiment was raised and organized in the State of New York at large, and commanded by Colonel Joseph J. Morrison. It was mustered into service from September 28th, 1863 to January 28th, 1864. Entering the service as it did after the worst was over (no reflection on the good will of the men) it was not given an opportunity to distinguish itself like many other regiments of the kind.

The first action in which the Herkimer county members of 16th engaged was inaugurated on April 26th, 1864, when a detachment of 1,150 men of the regiment, including those from Herkimer county, embarked on board transports at Yorktown, Va., for a point known as Bermuda Hundred, under command of Major Thomas I. Strong. Arriving there on the afternoon of the 27th, they marched five miles and bivouacked for the night, and the next morning marched six miles and camped near Hatch's Farm. After having been there a short time the 16th was attached to the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 10th army corps. On the 9th of August 600 men of the detachment went to Dutch Gap to dig on a camp. On the 15th they were severely shelled by the rebels, losing a few men. On the 16th they advanced and drove the enemy from Signal Hill, and held the position until the next day, then fell back to Dutch Gap.

The object in taking Signal Hill was to divert the attention of the enemy from other points. On the 19th the force returned to Hatch's Farm, and remained there until the 24th of August, when it started for the trenches in front of Petersburg, where it remained until the 24th of September, and had plenty to do. Captain O. W. Beach, of Company F, in a letter to Little Falls Journal under date of "Camp Laurel Hill, October 15th, 1864" said: "While in the trenches we lost several men killed and wounded and a few by disease. On the 24th of September we were relieved by the 2nd corps and taken back about two miles to prepare for other duties. We rested four days; then started out with all sorts of conjectures as to our destination, and marched about fifteen miles, arriving at Deep Bottom at 1 o' clock , A. M., very tired and thirsty. Water in this section is very scarce, and it is with much difficulty that we can obtain it at many times. At 4 o' clock, A. M., September 29th we were ordered to leave knapsacks and prepare ourselves in light marching order. The 10th and 18th corps then advanced upon Deep Bottom and routed the enemy, driving them to within three miles of Richmond. At night we returned four miles, and camped for the night. October 1st we made a reconnaissance in forces within one and a half miles of Richmond. The 2nd brigade had the advance. We have three regiments in our brigade that are armed with Spencer rifles, and as they are equal to seven men each on account of their breech-loading proclivities, we have to take the lead generally. The 16th was drawn up in line of battle as a reserve to the sharpshooters, who were deployed out as skirmishers, and thus we advanced to within a short distance of the outer line of defenses around Richmond. As we cross an open field we could plainly see the rebs load and point their cannons upon us. I am happy to say that though thus exposed we lost but a few men. Having satisfied ourselves as to the strength of the enemy, we marched back to the place we started from and camped, where we remained until the morning of the 7th. We were then ordered in line of battle and moved out in a piece of woods to await the approach of the enemy, who soon made their appearance. We received them with a sharp volley of musketry, and for fifty minutes there was an incessant fire kept up from both sides. At length the enemy, finding they could neither break our lines nor stand our fire, fell back. By this movement, I am proud to say, we gained a goodly number of prisoners. The 16th, by their conduct, gained for themselves a name that will be a credit to the State which they hail from."

"Our commanding general gave us great praise for the prompt manner in which we maintained our share of the battle. We had but 550 men engaged, and lost 68 killed and wounded, which was more then the rest of the brigade lost. On the 13th we again advanced in force and had a brisk fight with the enemy about three miles from Richmond."

"We are daily expecting to make another move of some kind, but to me it is a mystery what it will be. A soldier never knows what is in store for him."

The regiment (besides John Clark, of Little Falls, Company A) were over one hundred private soldiers from Herkimer county, as follows.

Ranslaer died on 17 December 1884 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.4

Children of Ranslaer Mills and Caroline Clark

Citations

  1. [S149] Glenwood Cemetery, Homer, NY , Lot26, Sec 8,.
  2. [S223] Mills, 1880 Census Cortland.
  3. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , (ADDENDA BY FLORENCE ASHLEY).
  4. [S149] Glenwood Cemetery, Homer, NY , Lot 26, Sect. 8.

Caroline Clark

F, b. 12 July 1838, d. 1920
     Caroline was born on 12 July 1838 at Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York.1,2,3 She was the daughter of Edward Clark and Mariah Baker. She married Ranslaer Mills in 1859 at Homer, Cortland County, New York.4 Caroline died in 1920 at Cortland, Cortland, New York.1,5

Children of Caroline Clark and Ranslaer Mills

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , (Addenda by: Florence Ashley),.
  2. [S149] Glenwood Cemetery, Homer, NY , Lot 26 Sec 8,.
  3. [S223] Mills, 1880 Census Cortland.
  4. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , (ADDENDA BY FLORENCE ASHLEY).
  5. [S149] Glenwood Cemetery, Homer, NY , Lot 26 Sec. 8.

Luther Crocker

M, b. 14 November 1802, d. 18 August 1883
     He married Chloe Hodges at Nantucket, Massachusetts. Luther was born on 14 November 1802 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Morton Crocker and Elizabeth Scudder. Realator. Luther died on 18 August 1883 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, at age 80.2 His body was interred on 20 August 1883 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Rose Hill Cemetery.2

Children of Luther Crocker and Chloe Hodges

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 122.
  2. [S309] Crocker, Luther, Death Certificate.

Chloe Hodges

F, b. 7 May 1805, d. 14 August 1878
     She married Luther Crocker at Nantucket, Massachusetts. Chloe Hodges was ill with respiratory disorder; Scrofula (TB.) Chloe was born on 7 May 1805 at Nantucket, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Capt. Issac Hodges and Lydia Crocker. Chloe died on 14 August 1878 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, at age 73.2 Her body was interred on 18 August 1878 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Rose Hill Cemetery.2

Children of Chloe Hodges and Luther Crocker

Citations

  1. [S31] Rogers, Thomas, Sawtelle , pg 176.
  2. [S307] Hodges, Chloe, Death Certificate.

Joshua Nye

M, b. 29 September 1807, d. 28 January 1900
      Obituary of Joshua Nye - June 1900
     
     Joshua Nye
Dies Aged 93 Years
      Rabid Abolitionist, Who took Part in John Brown Raid, Passes Away
     Four Generations Survive Noted Anti-Slavery Worker, who Succumbs in Chicago

      Joshua Nye the oldest member of the Illinois Society Sons of the American Revolution who took an active part in the historic John Brown raid during the civil war died Thursday night, aged 93 years, at the home of his daughter Mrs. David Straw. The old man was a rabid abolitionist and one of the principal factors in the freeing of the negro slaves at Harpers Ferry, which cost John Brown his life. He took no active part in the civil war, on account of his age, being 51 years old when it broke out. He lived at Richmond, IN, during that time and on many occasions was a prominent factor in abolitionist gatherings.
     
      At the time of his death Mr. Nye was one of five generations living. His brother Zadoc Nye is now residing in Richmond,IN at the advanced age of 96. The decedent had lived in Chicago since 1881. He was born in Barnstable county, new Cape Cod, MA., September 29, 1807. At the age of 7 years his father moved to Franklin county, IN., and engaged in the farming business. In 1831 young Nye, married Miss Mary C. Moorhead. Six children were the result of that union.
     
      The funeral will be held from the residence of his daughter this afternoon at 3 O'clock. Rev. L.P. Mercer will officiate and interment will be at Oakwoods.
      Three daughters Mrs John Roberts of Indianapolis, Mrs. David Strawbridge of Chicago, and Mrs. James G. Foard of Kalamazoo, Mich. Survive him. He also leaves twenty grandchildren, fourteen great grand children and four great-great grand children. Joshua Nye was ill with respiratory disorder; Pneumonia. Joshua was born on 29 September 1807 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Joshua Nye and Anna Snow. He married Mary C. Moorehead on 22 March 1831.2 Joshua Nye was present at Ella Nora Nye's christening on 19 June 1853.2 Joshua died on 28 January 1900 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, at age 92.2,3 His body was interred on 30 June 1900 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Oak Wood D5 - 123.3

Children of Joshua Nye and Mary C. Moorehead

Citations

  1. [S55] New York
    Frank E. Best
    Chicago, Il
    Edited by
    David Fisher Nye Elyria, Ohio Compiled by: George Hyatt Nye Auburn, Benjamin Nye of Sandwich, MA - His Anc. and Den., pg 303.
  2. [S55] New York
    Frank E. Best
    Chicago, Il
    Edited by
    David Fisher Nye Elyria, Ohio Compiled by: George Hyatt Nye Auburn, Benjamin Nye of Sandwich, MA - His Anc. and Den., pg 304.
  3. [S306] Nye, Joshua, Cemetery Information.

Mary C. Moorehead

F, b. 10 November 1811, d. 15 October 1892
      Mary C. Moorehead
     
     
      Married by Rev. Steward in Butler Co. She and Joshua lived on a farm in Franklin Co., In, until 1855, when they moved to Richmond, In. They resided two years in Indianapolis and in 1881 removed to Chicago where they lived until they died. They are both buried at Oakwood Cemetery.
     
Her body was interred at in Oakwood Cemetery. Mary was born on 10 November 1811 at near Oxford, Ohio.1 She was the daughter of Mathew Moorehead and Lydia Davids. She married Joshua Nye on 22 March 1831.2 Mary C. Moorehead was present at Ella Nora Nye's christening on 19 June 1853.2 Mary died on 15 October 1892 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, at age 80.2

Children of Mary C. Moorehead and Joshua Nye

Citations

  1. [S55] New York
    Frank E. Best
    Chicago, Il
    Edited by
    David Fisher Nye Elyria, Ohio Compiled by: George Hyatt Nye Auburn, Benjamin Nye of Sandwich, MA - His Anc. and Den., pg 303.
  2. [S55] New York
    Frank E. Best
    Chicago, Il
    Edited by
    David Fisher Nye Elyria, Ohio Compiled by: George Hyatt Nye Auburn, Benjamin Nye of Sandwich, MA - His Anc. and Den., pg 304.

Nathan Tuttle1

M, b. 1798, d. 27 November 1887
     Nathan was a preacher. Nathan was born in 1798 at Riverhead, Long Island, New York. He was the son of Nathan Tuttle and Esther Parshall. He married Moriah Leland Monroe in 1819 at Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. Nathan died on 27 November 1887 at Berlin Hights, Erie, Ohio.

Child of Nathan Tuttle and Moriah Leland Monroe

Citations

  1. [S140] Parshall Family, Parshall, James C.

Moriah Leland Monroe

F, b. 21 December 1800, d. February 1892
Moriah Monroe
     Moriah was born on 21 December 1800 at Croydon, New Hampshire, USA.1 She was the daughter of Joel Monroe and Lydia Hall. She married Nathan Tuttle in 1819 at Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York. Moriah died in February 1892 at Berlin Hights, Erie, Ohio, at age 91.

Child of Moriah Leland Monroe and Nathan Tuttle

Citations

  1. [S85] Fletcher Family, Fletcher, Edward H. , pg 281.

John Rood

M, b. 1808, d. 22 May 1865
     John was born in 1808 at Cannan, Connecticut, USA. He was the son of Capt. John Rood and Henrietta Logan. John Rood married Almira Kline on 21 July 1833 at Egremont, Massachusets.1 He married Jane Ann Miller on 8 September 1836 at Braceville, Ohio.1 John Rood married Jane L. Trescott on 17 September 1857 at Braceville, Ohio.1 John died on 22 May 1865 at Braceville or Phalanx, Trumbull, Ohio.

Child of John Rood and Almira Kline

Children of John Rood and Jane Ann Miller

Citations

  1. [S589] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Jane Ann Miller

F, b. circa 1817, d. 9 October 1856
     Jane Ann Miller was born circa 1817 at Ohio. She was the daughter of Gurdon Miller and Hannah Lane. She married John Rood on 8 September 1836 at Braceville, Ohio.1 Jane died on 9 October 1856 at Braceville, Trumbull, Ohio.

Children of Jane Ann Miller and John Rood

Citations

  1. [S589] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Melissa Miller

F, b. 1841
     Melissa was born in 1841 at prob. Rome, New York.1 She was the daughter of Harry H. Miller and Angeline Bates.

Citations

  1. [S150] Census 1855, Cortland, NY , HO-399.