Hannah Learned

F, b. 16 September 1690
     Hannah was born on 16 September 1690.1 She was the daughter of Benoni Learned and Sarah Wright. She married Capt. James Leland on 5 April 1710.2,3

Children of Hannah Learned and Capt. James Leland

Citations

  1. [S24] Learned Family, Learned, William , pg 36.
  2. [S24] Learned Family, Learned, William , pg 36;.
  3. [S101] Leland Magazine, Leland, Sherman , pg 5.

James Percival

M, d. 1691
     James was born at England.1
     
     
      James Percival, immigrant, begins his Will made January 19, 1691 as follows:
     
     
      "I James Parsivall of Suckenesset," this being the Indian name of that part of the southwestern Cape Cod now known as Falmouth. This town was incorporated June 4, 1686, but the name Falmouth was first used on March 16, 1693.
     
     
      His permanent home was in Falmouth where he owned much land besides his homestead. He had resided for a while in Virginia and Sandwich, MA but there is no record that he ever owned land in either place or that he was recorded as an inhabitant of Sandwich in any of the records naming the inhabitants of Sandwich.
     
     
      The first references to James Percival are in the Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 5, pgs 53 and 68.
     
     
      "Court at Plymouth, March 8, 1670: James Purseval, for his contempt of authority in not departing the colony according to order, and for his making an escape from one with whom he was sent, in reference to his going to Virginnia to clear himself of suspicion of having a hand in running away with a boat, etc., he was required to pay a fine of five pounds." .p
     
      July 5, 1671 pg 68, "Whereas 15 shillings in money was taken away from a servant of James Pursvall of Sandwich, who run away, the court orders 8 shillings to be paid to the constable for bringing him to Plymouth and the remainder to be paid to said Pursvall."
     
     
      This shows that James Percival, the New England Pioneer, was living in Virginia in 1670.
     
     
      James Pursval served on the jury at Plymouth court in 1675. He was a constable in Sandwich in 1677. He witnessed the Will of Thomas Dexter of Sandwich in 1687. It is probable that he was born in England and as his wife Mary Rainsford was baptized in Boston in 1632, it quite probable that he was born at a date not far from that.
     
     
      It appears that he did not own land in Virginia and from the fact that he acquired much land in Falmouth, MA, he probably would have been a land owner in Virginia if he had lived there more than two years. And as his name is not recorded among those early Virginian immigrants, it seems reasonable to conclude that he probably arrived in Virginia between 1668 and 1670, at which latter date he arrived in Sandwich from Virginia.
     
     
      There is a tradition that he was descended from Lord and Lady Percival, but this is indefinite. There is little doubt, however, but that James Percival was descended through lines not recorded or not yet discovered from Richard Perceval, the Crusader, who died soon after 1194 and was buried in Weston, Somerset, England.
     
      Ashleys of the Old Colony, pgs xviii-xxii.
     

He married Mary Rainsford in 1671 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2 James died in 1691 at Falmouth, Massachusetts.3

Children of James Percival and Mary Rainsford

Citations

  1. [S42] Ashley's Old Colony, Ashley, Robert E. , vol 1 pg xxii.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 571.
  3. [S42] Ashley's Old Colony, Ashley, Robert E. , pg xxii.

Mary Rainsford

F, b. 17 April 1632, d. 2 April 1694
     Mary was born on 17 April 1632 at Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Edward Raynsford and Mary NN----. She married William Bassett in 1653.2,3 She married James Percival in 1671 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.4 Mary died on 2 April 1694 at Falmouth, Massachusetts, at age 61.1

Children of Mary Rainsford and James Percival

Citations

  1. [S42] Ashley's Old Colony, Ashley, Robert E. , vol 1 pg xxii.
  2. [S42] Ashley's Old Colony, Ashley, Robert E. , vol 1 pg xx,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 50.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 571.

David Warren

M, b. 1724
     David was born in 1724 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 He was the son of Ephraim Warren and Tabitha Russell.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Lydia Warren

F, b. before 4 September 1726 (chr.
     Lydia was born before 4 September 1726 (chr. at Killingly, Connecticut. She was christened on 4 September 1726 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Tabitha Russell.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Rachel Warren

F, b. before 7 April 1728 (chr. dat
     Rachel was born before 7 April 1728 (chr. dat at Killingly, Connecticut. She was christened on 7 April 1728 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Tabitha Russell.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Priscilla Warren

F, b. 5 December 1730
     Priscilla was born on 5 December 1730 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Tabitha Russell.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Joseph Warren

M, b. 29 November 1732
     Joseph was born on 29 November 1732 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 He was the son of Ephraim Warren and Tabitha Russell.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Ephraim (Capt.) Warren

M, b. 24 June 1680, d. 20 April 1747
     Ephraim was born on 24 June 1680 at Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Jacob Warren and Mary Hildreth. According to conflicting evidence, he married Abigail Burnham in 1700 at Plainfield, Connecticut.2 He married Abigail Burnham on 13 May 1701 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.3
     
     
      Ephraim followed his brother Jacob to Plainfield, Ct. in 1703, and was active in affairs there until his removal about 1708, to Killingly, Ct. Jan. 2, 1707, it was voted that he be allowed "to enjoy his labor in getting fencing stuff in cedar swamp without molestation from the town (Plainfield)." Nov. 16, 1708, Ephraim Warren, husbandman, "of Killingly" purchased Thomas Stevens, Sr.'s right to the Owaneco land in the south of Killingly and the next day bought the interest in Killingly land of Jacob Warren, weaver, of Plainfield. April 14, 1709 Jacob Warren and two other selectmen of Plainfield proposed that the south line of Killingly shall begin at a black-oak tree (the reputed northwest bound of Plainfield) standing on the Quinebaug River near Sergeant Ephraim Warren's place. He with 43 others received a patent of the remaining lands in Killingly from the Governor and Company of Ct., Oct. 13, 1709, for 40 pounds paid through Capt. Chandler.
     
Ephraim (Capt.) Warren was present at Joseph Warren's christening on 11 May 1712 at Killingly, Connecticut.4 Ephraim (Capt.) Warren was present at Lydia Warren's christening on 2 September 1716 at Killingly, Connecticut.4 Ephraim died on 20 April 1747 at Killingly, Connecticut, at age 66.5

Children of Ephraim (Capt.) Warren and Abigail Burnham

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 16-19.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 781.
  3. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 16.
  4. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 19.
  5. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 17.

Abigail Burnham

F, b. 2 June 1680, d. 21 March 1742/43
     Abigail was born on 2 June 1680 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Burnham and Lydia Pengry. According to conflicting evidence, she married Ephraim (Capt.) Warren in 1700 at Plainfield, Connecticut.2 She married Ephraim (Capt.) Warren on 13 May 1701 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.3 Abigail Burnham was present at Joseph Warren's christening on 11 May 1712 at Killingly, Connecticut.4 Abigail Burnham was present at Lydia Warren's christening on 2 September 1716 at Killingly, Connecticut.4 Abigail died on 21 March 1742/43 at Killingly, Connecticut, at age 62.5

Children of Abigail Burnham and Ephraim (Capt.) Warren

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , PG 16-19.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 781.
  3. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 16.
  4. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 19.
  5. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg.

Sarah Warren

F, b. 11 March 1750/51, d. before 1770
     Sarah was born on 11 March 1750/51 at Killingly, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Sarah NN----. Sarah died before 1770.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Mary Warren

F, b. 3 March 1752/1753, d. before 1770
     Mary was born 3 March 1752/1753 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Sarah NN----. Mary died before 1770.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Abigail Warren

F, b. 20 July 1754
     Abigail was born on 20 July 1754.1 She was the daughter of Ephraim Warren and Sarah NN----.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

Jacob Warren

M, b. 19 March 1757
     Jacob was born on 19 March 1757 at Killingly, Connecticut.1 He was the son of Ephraim Warren and Sarah NN----.

Citations

  1. [S80] Warren, Arthur, Foster, Warren W. , pg 33.

William Crocker

M, b. 11 February 1615, d. September 1692
     William was born on 11 February 1615.1,2
      WILLIAM CROCKER
      ~ Pilgrim ~


     
      Deacon William Crocker married in 1636 Alice. She was living in 1683, was the mother of all his children; but died soon after that date. He married second Patience, widow of Robert Parker and daughter of Elder Henry Cobb. He died in the fall of 1692. His age is not stated, but he was probably about 80 years of age. His will is printed below at full length. It is a document that will be interesting to his descendants and to the public as a specimen of the manner in which those instruments were drawn up in olden times.
     
     
The last will and testament of Deacon William Crocker
of Barnstable, in New England.
     
     
     
     
      The 6th day of September Anno Dom. 1692 I, William Crocker of Barnstable, being sick and weak in body but through ye mercy of God of disposing mind and memory, and knowing ye uncertainty of this life on earth, and being desirous to settle things in order, do make this my last will and testament in manner and for me following, viz:
     
     
      first and principally, I give and committ my soul to God in Jesus Christ my Saviour and Redeemer throw whose pretious death and merrits I hope to find ye free pardon and remition of all my sinnes, and everlasting salvation, and my body to ye earth from whence it was taken, to be burried in such decent manner as to my Executor hereafter named, shall seem meet and convenient, and as touching my wordly estate which god hath in mercy lent unto me, my will is to bestow ye same as hereafter is expressed, and I do hereby revoke and make void all wills by me formerly made and declared and appoint this be by my last will and testament.
     
     
      Imprimus my will is that all those debts and duties which I owe in right or conscience to any person or persons whatsoever, shall be will and truly contented and paid when convenient by my Executor.
     
     
      Itt. I give and bequeath unto Patience my loving wift besides ye liberty to dispose of all ye estate which she brought with her or had at ye time of our intermarriage, and besides ye forty pounds I then promised to give her. incase she should survive me, I give unto her my gest bedd and bedstead with all ye furniture thereto belonging.
     
     
      Itt. I give and bequeath to my eldest son John Crocker, my now dwelling house and lands both upland and fresh meadows adjoyning and belonging thereunto now and of late under my occupation and improvement to have and to hold to him his heirs and assignes forever he or they paying to ye s'd Patience my wife twenty pounds of ye fores'd forty pounds she is to receive, and I do also hereby confirm to him my son John his heirs and assignes forever all those parcels of land I heretofore gave unto him and are well known to have been in his quiet possession for sundry years; I further also give and bequeath to him my son John my two oxen which he hath had in his posession some years.
     
     
      Itt. I give and bequeath unto my son Job Crocker besides ye land I heretofore gave him and know to be in his possession, twenty acres of that fifty acres at ye ponds which I purchased of John Coggin to have and to hold to him my son Job his heirs and assignes forever and that he chuse it on which side of s'd land he please.
     
     
      Itt. I will and bequeath to my sons Josiah and Eliazer Crocker besides those lands I heretofore gave to each of them and are in their particular knowne possession, all my upland at the marsh together with all ye marsh adjoining thereunto, (except such particular parcel or parcels thereof as I have heretofore given and is possest of late by any other or is in these presents hereafter mentioned) to be equally divided between them ye s's Josiah and Eliazer to have and to hold to them their heirs and assignes forever: Each of them ye s'd Josiah and Eliazer paying seven pounds and ten shillings apiece to ye s'd Patience in paying of ye forty pounds above mentioned. And I further will and bequeath to my sons Josiah and Eliazer to each one cow.
     
     
      Itt. I will and bequeath unto my son Joseph Crocker (besides ye two parcels of upland and one parcel of marsh which I heretofore gave him and is know to be in his possession ye house and land which he hired of me and now lives on) that is to say, so much of my s'd land as he hath now fenced in; together with that parcel of marsh which he hath from year to year of late hired of me; to have and to hold to him ye s'd Joseph his heir and assignes forever: he or they paying five pounds to ye s'd Patience to make up ye full of s'd forty pounds I promised to her as above s'd.
     
     
      Itt. I vie and bequeath all ye rest of my lands att ye ponds to my grandsons, viz: to Nathaniel, ye son of John Crocker, Samuel, ye son of Job Crocker, and Thomas, ye son of Josiah Crocker to be equally divided between them and to their and each of their heirs and assignes forever.
     
     
      Itt. my will is and I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty and will beloved son Job Crocker to be my sole executor to see this my last will and testament to be performed, with whom I leave all ye residue of my estate in whatsoever it be, to be equally distributed amongst all my children unless I shall signifie my minde to have such part or parts thereof to be disposed to any in particular.
     
     
      In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal.
     
     
      On my further consideration I signifie my mind before ye ensealing hereof and it is my will that Mr. Russell shall have my tow steers which are att Isaac Howlands and that Mr Thomas Hinckly shall have my nagro boy if he please he paying fourteen pounds to my Executor for him.
     
WILLIAM CROCKER ___[SEAL.]
     
Signed Sealed and declared
In presence of
     
SAMUEL CHIPMAN
MERCY CHIPMAN
     
     
      Samuel Chipman and Mercy Chipman whose hands are sett as witnesses to this will made oath in Court October ye 19: 1692, that they did see the above said William Crocker now deceased sign seal and declare this above written to be his last will and testament.
     
JOSEPH LOTHROP: cl.
     
     
      Examined and duly compared with ye original will and entered October ye 22, 1692.
     
Attest: JOSEPH LOTHROP. Recorder.

     
     
     
      The division which Deacon Crocker made of his estate in the foregoing will may perhaps, be better understood by the following description of the shares of each of his five sons. Job had the estate which was his uncle John's homestead, and his father therefore fives him a larger proportion of his estate, not immediately connected with the West Barnstable farm.
     
     
      John had the great lot of his uncle John, on which he had a house, and therefore, there was no immediate need that he should be provided for. For his other four sons he had provided houses, or they had built on his land.
     
     
      The present road running north from the West Barnstable Meeting House, to the Cape Cod Rail Road Depot, divides Dea.. Crocker's farm into two nearly equal parts. On the east of the road, Josiah had the south part, excepting the portion given to John and Joseph the north. On the west side, John had the south part, including a strip running north to the meadows, and a strip on the east, adjoing Josiah's land, where Nathaniel Crocker afterwards lived, and Eleazer the north-westerly part. A question arises which will be heareafter considered, and that is, whether or not John's portion extended far enough west to include the old stone fort.
     
     
      Deacon Crocker died in good old age. For many years he was deacon of the Barnstable Church, and living an exemplary and pious life. He has a clean record. Nothing dishonest or dishonorable was ever laid to his charge. Men who acquire great wealth often make enemies of the envious: but Dea.. Crocker appears to have been beloved and respected by all. When he removed to West Barnstable, the lands there had only a nominal value. He was industrious, economical, and a good manager. His boys were as industrious and as prudent as the father, and that was the whole secret of their becoming wealthy. In early colonial times a large family was considered a great blessing in a pecuniary point of view. The boys assisted the father on the farm, and at seventeen were able to do the work of a man. The girls were also brought up to more than earn their own living. They assisted the mother, spun and wove the flax and the wool, and made their own and their brother's garments, and in hay time and at harvest assisted their brothers. A man with a large family of healthy children was then the most independent of men. From his farm and his household he obtained an abundance of the prime necessaries of life. The surplus which he sold was more than sufficient to pay the bills of the mechanic, and to buy the few articles of foreign growth and manufacture the required. There was very little money in Circulation, and very little was needed. Taxes were payable in agricultural products, at a rate fixed by law, and if lands or property were sold, without it was expressly stipulated in the contract, that payment should be made in silver money, it was barter trade, payable in produce at the "prices current with the merchants."
     
     
      Aged people often remark that their ancestors estimated that every son born to them added to their wealth a 100 pounds, and of every daughter 50 pounds. However heterodox this theory may now appear to parents, or to political economists, it was undoubtedly true in early times. The Crocker's with few exceptions all married in early life, had large families, and excepting the few who tried to live by trade or speculation, acquired good estates, lived comfortably, and were respectable and honorable members of society.
     
     
      Two brothers John and Willaim Crocker, were among the first settlers in Barnstable, Willaim came with Mr. Lothrop and his church Oct. 21, 1639 and John the following Spring. John Crocker, the elder brother left no family; but Willaim's posterity are very numerous. Perhaps no one of the first comers, has more descendants now living. A large majority of all in the United States, and in the British Provinces of the name, trace their descent from Dea.. William of Barnstable.
     
     
      It is said most likely came over in 1634, either in the same ship with Rev. Mr. Lothrop, or in another that sailed about the same time, and that they stopped in Roxbury before the settled in Scituate. They did not remain long in Roxbury, for their names do not appear on the Massaachusetts Colony Records.
     
     
      Crocker,
or Crocker as the name is usually written in England is very ancient. An old proverbial distich record that : "Crosker, Crewys, and Copplestone, When the Conqueror came, were at home." The family of Crocker, originally seated at Crocker's Hale, and Croker. For, in Devonshire, became possessed of Lineham, by marriage with the heirs of Churchill. The genealogy of the Crockers of Lineham is accurately recorded and exhibits a descent of eleven John Crockers in almost uniterrupted succession. Members of the family removed to Cornwall, Waterford, and other places.
     
     
      WILLIAM CROCKER, joined Mr. Lothrop's church in Scituate Dec. 25, 1636. He came to Barnstable Oct.21 1639, and his daughter Elizabeth, baptized Dec. 22, 1639, is the fourth on the list, showing that he was among the first who came. He built a frame house in Scituate in 1636; the forty-fourth built in that town. June 3,1644 he was propounded a freeman, but does not appear to have been admitted till after 1652. He was constable of Barnstable, in 1644, on the grand jury in 1654,55,57,61,and 75; selectman in 1668; deputy to the Colony Court in 1670, 71, and 74; and surveyor of the highways in 1673. In the year of 1675 he was on the jury which condemened the murders of John Sassamon, secretary of King Phillip. He was one of the leading men in early times and was often employed in the business of the town and in settling the estates of deceased persons.
     
     
      He probably settled first in the easterly part of the town, and removed to West Barnstable about the year 1643.
     
     
      The loss of the early records makes it difficult to decide, but it is probable that his first house in Barnstable was on the lot next west of Henry Bourne's. He had a large landed estate, and for many years was perhaps the RICHEST MAN IN TOWN. His sons were all men of wealth. In 1703 his son Joseph was the owner of the largest estate in Barnstable.
     
     
      In 1655, Dea.. William Crocker owned one hundred and twenty-six acres of upland, and twenty-two acres of meadow at West Barnstable, and forty acres of upland at the Indian ponds. (Indian ponds are three in number, and from the head waters of the stream now known as Marston's Mill river.) The West Barnstable farm was bounded easterly by the farm of John Smith, now known as the Otis farm, and by the farm of Samuel Hinckley, now owned by Levi L. Goodspeed, southerly it extended into the woods. The southerly part of the farm, in 1654, was bounded on the west by the commons, and the northerly part by lands then owned by Governor Bodfish, and afterwards by Lieut. John Howland. He afterwards added largely to his West Barnstable farm, and to the farm at the Indian pond, the latter containing one hundred acres at his death. The West Barnstable farm was two miles in length from north to south, extending from the salt meadows on the waters at Barnstable harbor to the neighborhood of the West Barnstable meeting house. The lands he first occupied were the south-easterly part of the farm, the old stone house which, according to tradition, was the first residence, was about a fourth of mile easterly from the West Barnstable Church. This stone fortification house was taken down many years ago. A few aged persons remember to have seen it in a ruinous state. This part of the farm his son Josiah afterwards owned. There was another stone house on the south-westerly part of the farm owned by the descendants of Eleazer. This was taken down about the year 1815. It was called the old Stone Fort, and stood where Capt. Josiah Fish's house now stands. It was about 25 feet in front and 20 feet on the rear. The walls of the lower story were built of rough stones laid in clay mortar, and nearly three feet in thickness. The upper story was of wood and projected over the lower on the front about three feet. In this projection were a number of loop holes about six inches square, closed by small trap doors. The windows in the lower story were high and narrow. These and the loop holes in the projection, were intended to be used as portholes, should the building be assaulted by hostile Indians. The earliest know occupant, to any now living, was Mr. Benoni Crocker, a great-grand-son of Dea.. William. He made a two story addition on the south-side, which was occupied by his son Barnabas.
     
     Excerpts taken from "Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families"
     by Amis Otis


     
Notes of : Thomas Crocker of Alexandria, VA


      A CROCKER GENEALOGY
      VOLUME II [A-1 through A-10]


     . He married Alice Foster? before 1636 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.3 He married Patience Cobb after 1684/85 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.4,5 William died in September 1692 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at age 77.6

Children of William Crocker and Alice Foster?

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 200.
  2. [S339] Crocker Genalogy, Leonard, Andrea.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 192.
  4. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 171,.
  5. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 19.
  6. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , whole Book.

Alice Foster?

F
     Alice died. Alice was born.1 She married William Crocker before 1636 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.2 As of before 1636,her married name was Crocker.2 Her body was interred on 4 May 1684 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3,4

Children of Alice Foster? and William Crocker

Citations

  1. [S402] GENEA. NOTES OF BARN. FAM. PG 205.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 192.
  3. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 1;.
  4. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 205.

Timothy Crocker1

M, b. April 1681
     Timothy was born in April 1681.2 He was the son of Sgt. Joseph Crocker and Temperance Bursley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 6.

Noah Crocker1

M, b. December 1683
     Noah was born in December 1683 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Sgt. Joseph Crocker and Temperance Bursley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 6.

Joanna Crocker1

F, b. 18 July 1687, d. 13 April 1766
     Joanna was born on 18 July 1687 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 She was the daughter of Sgt. Joseph Crocker and Temperance Bursley. Joanna died on 13 April 1766 at age 78.2

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 6.

Martha Crocker1

F, b. 22 February 1689/90
     Martha was born on 22 February 1689/90 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 She was the daughter of Sgt. Joseph Crocker and Temperance Bursley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 7.

John Bursley1

M, b. circa 1600, d. 21 August 1660
      Inventory of Mr. John Bursley, of Barnstable, 21 August 1660, by John Smith and John Chipman, amount 115.5 pounds.
     
     

John was born circa 1600 at England. John immigrated to (an unknown value) in September 1623.2 He married Joanna Hull on 28 November 1639 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.3,4 John Bursley was present at Mary Bursley's christening on 29 July 1643.5 John Bursley was present at John Bursley's christening on 22 September 1644 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 John Bursley was present at Joanna Bursley's christening on 1 March 1645/46 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 John Bursley was present at Elizabeth Bursley's christening on 25 March 1650 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 John Bursley was present at John Bursley's christening on 11 April 1652 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 John died on 21 August 1660 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.6

Children of John Bursley and Joanna Hull

Citations

  1. [S329] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration Begins.
  2. [S403] Hartford Times.
  3. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 130,.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 123.
  5. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 133.
  6. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pgs 127-133.

Joanna Hull1

F, b. circa 1620, d. after 1686/87
     Joanna was born circa 1620 at Northleigh, county Devon, England.2 She was the daughter of Reverend Joseph Hull and Joanna NN----. She married John Bursley on 28 November 1639 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.3,4 Joanna Hull was present at Mary Bursley's christening on 29 July 1643.5 Joanna Hull was present at John Bursley's christening on 22 September 1644 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 Joanna Hull was present at Joanna Bursley's christening on 1 March 1645/46 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 Joanna Hull was present at Elizabeth Bursley's christening on 25 March 1650 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 Joanna Hull was present at John Bursley's christening on 11 April 1652 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.5 She married Dolor Davis after 1660/61 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.6 Joanna died after 1686/87.

Children of Joanna Hull and John Bursley

Citations

  1. [S329] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration Begins.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 28.
  3. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 130,.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 123.
  5. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 133.
  6. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 205.

Temperance Crocker1

F, b. 26 August 1694
     Temperance was born on 26 August 1694 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 She was the daughter of Sgt. Joseph Crocker and Temperance Bursley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 7.

Thomas Crocker1,2

M, b. 28 May 1671, d. April 1728
     Thomas was born on 28 May 1671 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3 He was the son of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley. Thomas died in April 1728 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, at age 56.4

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. ,,.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos.
  3. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 4.
  4. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 216.

Mercy Crocker1

F, b. 12 February 1674/75
     Died early in life. Mercy died at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts. Mercy was born on 12 February 1674/75 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 She was the daughter of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 4.

Alice Crocker1,2

F, b. 25 December 1679, d. February 1718/19
     Alice was born on 25 December 1679 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3 She was the daughter of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley. Alice died in February 1718/19 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, at age 39.3

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. ,,.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos.
  3. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 4.

Josiah Crocker1

M, b. 8 February 1684/85
     Josiah was born on 8 February 1684/85 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 4.

Ebenezer Crocker1

M, b. 30 May 1687
     Ebenezer was born on 30 May 1687 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 4.

Seth Crocker1

M, b. 23 September 1689, d. 27 January 1719/20
     Seth was born on 23 September 1689 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley. Seth died on 27 January 1719/20 at Haverhill, Massachusetts, at age 30. Unmarried.2

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , Pg 5.

Benjamin Crocker1

M, b. 26 September 1692
     Benjamin was born on 26 September 1692 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Josiah Crocker and Melatiah Hinckley.

Citations

  1. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A.
  2. [S48] Crocker Genealogy, Walter, William A. , pg 5.