Elkanah Hamblen1

M
     Elkanah was born at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of James Hamblen Jr. and Mary Dunham.

Citations

  1. [S281] Hamlin Family, Andrews, Franklin.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

Benjamin Hamblen

M, b. before 16 March 1684/1685 (ch
     Benjamin was born before 16 March 1684/1685 (ch at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts. He was christened on 16 March 1684/85 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of James Hamblen Jr. and Mary Dunham.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

James Hamblen1

M, d. 1690
     James was born at England.2
     
     
      As nearly all the first settlers of Barnstable came from London and the County of Kent, it is probable that James Hamblen, the ancestor, came from that city, as stated by Mr. David Hamblen in the New England Historic and Genealogical Journal. Of his early history little is known. He appears to have been an early member of Mr. Lothrop's Church, though the date is not found on the record. His son Bartholemew was baptized 24 April 1642, but the baptism of his older children, James and Hannah, do not appear on the record. It is probable that they were born in England, and that neither they nor their morther came over so early as the father. This was a common occurrence in early times. The father came over, and when he had provided a home sent for his family.
     
      He was one of the earliest settlers, and was in Barnstable in the spring of 1639. His houselot, containing eight acres, was at Coggin's Pond, and was one of those that was presumed were laid out under the authority of Mr. Collicut. It was bounded northerly by the lot of Gov. Hinckley, easterly by the Commons, southerly by the Commons, and westerly by the highway, which at that time after crossing the hill on the west turned to the north on the borders of the pond, and thence, turned easterly, joining the present road at the head of Cave's Pasture Lane. In 1686 the present road was laid out through Hamblen's lot, and leaving a triangular shaped portion of it on the northof the road. The Hamblens were allowed to enclose that part of the old road situate between their land and the pond, and adjoining to Gov. Hinckley's.
     
      Goodman Hamblen was not much in public life. He was an honest man, a good neighbor, and a sincere christian. He was industrious, and prudent in his habits, and brought up his children to walk in his footsteps. His descendants have, with few exceptionns, inherited the good quaalities of their ancestor. The Hon. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice President of the United States, is the only one among them who has been eminent in public life.
     





He married Anne NN---- before 1638 at England.3,4 James died in 1690 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.4

Children of James Hamblen and Anne NN----

Citations

  1. [S328] NEHGR Volume CXLIX, October 1995.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 522.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 339,.
  4. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 523.

Anne NN----

F, d. after 1690/91
     She married James Hamblen before 1638 at England.1,2 Anne died after 1690/91 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3

Children of Anne NN---- and James Hamblen

Citations

  1. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 339,.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 523.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 339.

Hannah Hamblen

F, b. before 1636
     Hannah was born before 1636 at London, county Middlesex, England.1 She was the daughter of James Hamblen and Anne NN----.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

Bartholemew Hamblen

M, b. 11 April 1642
     Bartholemew was born on 11 April 1642 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of James Hamblen and Anne NN----.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

John Hamblen1

M, b. 26 June 1644, d. 1718
     Resided at Hamblen's Pain, West Barnstable. He was a farmer. His wife Sarah Bearse was an early member of the Church, he did not join till late in life. The will of his son John, who died unmarried in 1734, furnishes many particulars respecting this family.
John was born on 26 June 1644 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of James Hamblen and Anne NN----. He married Sarah Bearse in August 1667 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts. John died in 1718 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.

Children of John Hamblen and Sarah Bearse

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

Sarah Hamblen

F, b. 7 November 1647
     Sarah was born on 7 November 1647 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of James Hamblen and Anne NN----.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

Eleazer Hamblen1

M, b. 17 March 1649/50
     Eleazer was born on 17 March 1649/50 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of James Hamblen and Anne NN----. He married Mehitabel Jenkins in October 1675 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts. Eleazer died.

Citations

  1. [S328] NEHGR Volume CXLIX, October 1995.
  2. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

Israel Hamblen

M, b. 25 June 1652
     Israel was born on 25 June 1652 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of James Hamblen and Anne NN----.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 524.

James Scudder

M, b. before 13 January 1695/1696 (
     James was born before 13 January 1695/1696 ( at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts. He was christened on 13 January 1695/96 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of John Scudder and Elizabeth Hamlin.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 233.

David Scudder

M, b. 23 July 1726
     David was born on 23 July 1726 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

Elizabeth Scudder

F, b. 9 January 1727/28
     Elizabeth was born on 9 January 1727/28 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

Samuel Scudder

M, b. 19 June 1729
     Samuel was born on 19 June 1729 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

Rebekah Scudder

F, b. 26 May 1731
     Rebekah was born on 26 May 1731 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

Lydia Scudder

F, b. 15 July 1735
     Lydia was born on 15 July 1735 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

Elizer Scudder

M, b. 12 February 1737/38
     Elizer was born on 12 February 1737/38 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Ebenezer Scudder and Lydia Cobb.

Citations

  1. [S186] Barnstable and Sand, Smith, Leonard , pg 104.

James D. Scudder

M, b. 27 October 1779, d. 22 October 1840
     James was born on 27 October 1779 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Ebenezer Scudder and Rose Delap. James D. Scudder died on 22 October 1840 at age 60.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 312.

Thomas D. Scudder

M, b. 25 January 1782, d. 1831
     Thomas was born on 25 January 1782 at Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Ebenezer Scudder and Rose Delap. Thomas died in 1831.

Citations

  1. [S49] Gen.Notes Barn. Fam., Otis, Amos , pg 312.

Stephen Hopkins

M, b. circa 1578, d. 1644
     Stephen was born circa 1578 at Co. Hampshire, England.1 He married Mary circa 1604 at England.2,3 He married Elizabeth Fisher on 19 February 1617/18 at in St. Mary Matfellon Whitechapel, London, England.4,5,3
     
     
      Stephen Hopkins sailed in the Mayflower in 1620, one of the "Londoners" or "Strangers" recruited for the voyage. He was called "Master" and only two others of the 17 free men on the voyage were so styled. He seems to have originated from the family of Hopkins, alias Seborne, located for several generations at Wortley, Wotton Underedge, co. Gloucester. The Wortley historian has conjectured, after a thorough study of the family, that Stephen of the Mayflower may well have been son of Stephen Hopkins, a clothier of Wortley who also had a son Robert Hopkins of London.
     
      Stephen Hopkins was probably the young man of that name who served as minister's clerk on the vessel Sea Venture which sailed from London 2 June 1609, bound for Virginia. The ship was severely damaged in a hurricane, and the company was washed ashore on the Bermudan "Ile of Divels" on 28 July. The 150 survivors were marooned on the island for nine months, building two vesses which ultimately took them to Virginia. During the sojourn Stephen Hopkins encouraged an uprising by his fellows upon grounds that the Governor's authority pertained only to the voyage and the regime in Virginia, not to the forced existence in Bermuda. For his remarks he was placed under guard, brought before the company in manacles and sentenced to death by court-martial. "But so penitent hee was and made so much moane, alleadging the ruine of his Wife and Children in this his trespasse," according to William Strachey's record of the voyage, that friends among his cohorts procured a pardon from the Governor. The two newly built vessels, the Patience and the Deliverance, arrived at Jamestown on 24 May 1610, but no evidence has been found of Hopkins' residence there, and it is presumed he soon returned to his family in England. Strachey noted that while Hopkins was very religious, he was contentious and defiant of authority and possessed enough learning to undertake to wrest leadership from others.
     
      The home in England of Stephen Hopkins was just outside of London Wall on the high road entering the city at Aldgate in the vicinity of Heneage House. In this neighborhood lived John Carver and William Bradford of the Mayflower company; Robert Cushman, the London agent for the Pilgrims; and Edward Southworth, who later came to New England. Stephen was called a tanner or leathermaker at the time of the Mayflower voyage.
     
      The name of Stephen's first wife remains unknown. No authority has been found for the oft published identification of her as Constance Dudley.
His second wife was named Elizabeth, and it seems certain that the marriage of Stephen Hopkins and Elizabeth Fisher on 19 February 1617 at St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, London, pertains to them.
     
      Stephen, wife Elizabeth and children Giles and Constance by first wife and daughter Damaris by second wife, and two men servants, Edward Doty and Edward Lister, came on the Mayflower. Son Oceanus was born during the voyage. Upon the ship's arrival at Cape Cod 11 November 1620, Stephen was among the men sigining the Mayflower Compact in the cabin. He was one of three men designated to provide counsel and advice to Captain Myles Standish on the first land expedition of the Pilgrims in the New World. During the third day out, the company chanced upon an Indian deer trap, and Stephen was able to explain its function and danger to his fellows. In Februar of 1620, when Indians appeared on a neighboring hilltop, Captain Standish took Stephen Hopkins with him to negotiate with the savages. Thereafter, Stephen was invariably deputized to meet the Indians and act as an interpreter. In July of 1621 he served as envoy to friendly Chief Massasoit, and he made a friend for the colonists of Samoset, another Indian whom Stephen entertained in his home.
     
      Despite the mortality caused by tribulations of the first Pilgrim winter in New England, Stephen Hopkins household of eight persons was one of only four households that escaped loss.
     
      Stephen Hopkins was referred to as a merchant and a planter in Plymouth records, also as "Gentleman" and "Master". He received a six-acre lot in the division of land in 1623 and later had other plots by grant or purchase. It is stated that he kept for his home throughout his life at Plymouth the lot on the easterly corner of Main and Leyden Streets that had been assigned to him on arrival. He built and owned the first wharf in Plymouth colony of which there is record, selling it for sixty pounds in July of 1637. He built a house at Yarmouth on Cape Cod but returned to Plymouth and gave the Yarmouth dwelling to son Giles, who remained there.
     
      Stephen Hopkins was made freeman by 1633 and served with sons Giles and Caleb and son-in-law Jacob Cooke as "Voluntary" in the Pequot War of 1637. He held the position of Assistant in the Colony from at least 1633 to 1636.
     
      Probably because of his status in the Colony as a "stranger," Stephen Hopkins found himself on occasion in offical difficulty. In June of 1636, while serving as Assistant, he was fined for battery of John Tisdale. In 1637 and 1638 he was charged with various indiscretions involving the sale of intoxicants and other items at his dwelling. In 1638 he was found in contempt of court for refusing to deal fairly with Dorothy Temple, an apprentice girl, and in December of 1639 he was charged with selling a looking glass at an excessive price.
     
      The will of Stephen Hopkins, dated 6 June 1644, was proved upon testimony of William Bradford and Myules Standish at a General Court at Plymouth on 20 August 1644. Calling himself of Plymouth in New England and "weake yet in good and perfect memory," he directed that his body be "buryed as neare as convenyently may be to my fyfe, Deceased." He made these bequests:
     
      To Son Giles Hopkins the great bull now in the hads of Mris. Warren.
     
      To Steven Hopkins
"my sonn Giles his sonne," 20 shillings in Mris. Warren's hands for the hire of said bull.
     
      To daughter Constanc Snow, wife of Nicholas, "my mare."
     
      To daughter Deborah Hopkins "the brodhorned black cowe and heiffer and the white faced calf andhalf the cowe called Mottley."
     
      To daughter Damaris Hopkins "the cowe called Damaris heiffer and the white faced calf and half the cowe called Mottley."
     
      To daughter Ruth "the cowe called Red Cole and her calfe and a Bull at Yarmouth wch is in the keepeing of Giles Hopkins
     
      To daughter Elizabeth "the cowe called Smykins and her calf and thother half of the Curld Cowe with Ruth and an yearelinge heiffer wthouta tayle in the keepeing of Gyles Hopkins at Yarmouth."
     
      To four daughters Deborah, Damaris, Ruth and Elizabeth Hopkins, all the moveable goods that belonged to his house, "and in case any of my said daughters should be taken away by death before they be marryed then... their division to be equally devided amongst the Survivors."
     
      To son Caleb, "heire apparent," house and lands at Plymouth, one pair of oxen and the hire of them, then in the hands of Richard Church, and "all my debts which are now oweing unto me."
     
      The testator reserved to his daughters "free recourse to my house in Plymouth upon any occcation there to abide and rmayne for such tyme as any of them shall thinke meete and conveyent and they single persons." He named son Caleb as executor, and Caleb and Captain Standish as joint supervisors of the will.
     
      The invetory of his goods, taken by Captain Standish, Thomas Willet and John Doane on 17 July 1644, listed livestock (fifteen neat cattle, a horse and other stock), household goods, clothing, tools and more than seventeen pounds owed to Hopkins by debtors. The estate was given a total value of about 130 pounds. The division of his moveable estate to daughters Deborah, Damaris, Ruth and Elizabeth was made by son Caleb and Captain Standish on 30 November 1644.
     
      In his list of the Mayflower passengers, Governor Bradford included: "Mr. Steven Hopkins, and Elizabeth, his wife, and 2 Children, caled Giles, and Constanta, a doughter, both by a former wife; and 2 more by his wife caled Damaris and Oceanus; the last was borne at sea; and tow servants, called Edward Doty and Edward Litster." Taking note of changes after 30 years, Bradford wrote of the Hopkins family in the spring of 1651: Mr. Hopkins and his wife are both dead, but they lived above 20 years in this place, and had one sone and 4 doughters borne here. Ther sone became a seaman, and dyed at Barbadoes; one daughter dyed here, and 2 are maried, one of them hath 2 children; and on is yet to mary. So their increase which still surivive anre 5. But his sone Giles is maried and hath 4 children. His doughter Constanta is alos maried, and hath 12 children, all of them living, and one of them maried."
     
     



He was listed on a passenger list on 5 August 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower". Stephen Hopkins witnessed :

The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1634-1638 between the Pequot tribe against an alliance of the Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies with Native American allies (the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes).

The result was the elimination of the Pequot as a viable polity in what is present-day Southern New England.

Most of the Pequot people, warriors or otherwise, were killed by the colonists and their allies, or captured and sold into slavery in Bermuda. Other survivors were dispersed. It would take the Pequot more than three and a half centuries to regain political and economic power in their traditional homeland region along the Pequot (present-day Thames) and Mystic rivers in what is now southeastern Connecticut. in 1634. Stephen died in 1644 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.1

Children of Stephen Hopkins and Mary

Children of Stephen Hopkins and Elizabeth Fisher

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 7.
  2. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 7,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 387.
  4. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 4,.
  5. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 387,.

Mary1

F, d. 1613
     She married Stephen Hopkins circa 1604 at England.2,3 Mary died in 1613.4 She was buried on 9 May 1613 at Hursley, Hampshire.

Children of Mary and Stephen Hopkins

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , v. 6 p. 5.
  2. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 7,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 387.
  4. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 5.

Constance Hopkins

F, b. circa 1607, d. October 1677
      Constance Hopkins came on the Mayflower with her family. Nicholas Snow came on the Ann in 1623 and was made freeman at Plymouth in 1633. He was named in 1634 to lay out highways at Plymouth, and he served there as arbitrator, surveyor of highways and on juries. By 1645 he had settled at Eastham where he served as clerk, selectman deputy, constable, highway surveyor, excise collector, and on court committees.
     
     
Her body was interred at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 Constance was born circa 1607 at England.2 She was the daughter of Stephen Hopkins and Mary. She was listed on a passenger list in 1620 at sailing on the "Mayflower".3 She married Nicholas Snow circa 22 May 1627 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.4,5,6 Constance died in October 1677 at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.7

Children of Constance Hopkins and Nicholas Snow

Citations

  1. [S425] Cove Burying Ground.
  2. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 6 pg 7.
  3. [S68] Plymouth Colony, Stratton, Eugene A.
  4. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 9,.
  5. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 692.
  6. [S615] Caleb Johnson, True Origin of Stephen Hopkins.
  7. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 6 pg 9.

Nicholas Snow1

M, d. 5 November 1676
     Nicholas was born at England.2
Nicholas Snow came to America from England on the Anne in 1623. Possibly the Nicholas Snow, son of Nicholas Snow, baptized St. Leonard's Shoreditch, London, 25 January 1599. He settled
first in Plymouth and had a share of Plymouth. He was one of Stephen Hopkins company in 1627. He was a freeman and a taxpayer in 1627. He
married Constance Hopkins, daughter of Stephen Hopkins who came on the Mayflower. Bradford in 1650 says he had 12 all alive and well.

Reference "Vol II, F. 365" "The descendants of Nicholas Snow 1st. are
like snow-flakes for a multitude, and found in most of the Cape towns,
and scattered abroad."

Reference "p. 373" "Nicholas Snow with brothers Anthony and William came
in the Anne in 1623 from England to Plymouth. Nicholas and Anthony brought families with them. William was an apprentice and settled in Duxbury. Anthony went first to Plymouth, then in 1642 to Marshfield. Nicholas was an associate of Governor Prince and a man of note; deputy, town clerk, selectman, etc. many years. Wife Constance died a widow in
1677. Large family. Among them Mark, born 9 May 1628, probably the eldest, was a man of large influence and usefulness; deputy, selectman, and succeeded his father as town clerk and served many years. Nicholas Snow town-clerk of Nauset (declared June 2, 1646, granted to be a township and have all the privileges of a township as other towns within the government have.) Settlement began with 7 families, 49 souls in all.
In 1651 ordered (by act of General Court) that the town be henceforth called and known by the name of Eastham. Nicholas a representative of the settlement then at General Court.

      Will of Nicholas Snow

I Nicholas Snow of Eastham being old and infirm of body but of perfect
memory and understanding, not knowing the day of my departure but yet daily expecting my last change I think it meet to leave this behind mee as my last will and testament.

Impt. I commend my sole into the arms of God's Mercy through Christ Jesus in whom I hope to sleep, and my body to a decent burial; and as concerning my temporal estate that God of his Goodness has given me, it is my last will and testament that after this manner it should be disposed of.

Impt. To my son Mark I give and bequeath all that twenty acres of upland lying at Namskaket where his house now stands, and two acres of meadow, and all that broken marsh thereof mine at Namskakett. Item, two thirds of my great lott at Satuckett lying next the Indian Ground, and that side of my lott west of the Indian land I give to him, and his heirs lawfully
begotten of his body forever; and what he can purchase more of upland and
meadow of the Indians thereatt Satuckett, I give to him all this abovesaid
lands or meadow or marsh purchased or unpurchased, I give to him and to his heirs lawfully begotten of his body forever.

Imp. To my son Joseph Snow I give the other third part of my great lott at
Satuckett and two acres and a half of meadow lying at Namskekett near the
head, and an neck of upland between it on the west side of William Twinnings all his abovesaid land and meadow I give to my son Joseph Snow, and to his heirs lawfully begotton of his body forever.

Imp. To my son Stephen Snow I give twenty acres on the south side of my great lott at Porchett, and ten acres of my little side lott at Satuckett, lying between Daniel Cole and Edward Bangs by the side of a little pond
an acre and a half of meadow at the Boat Meadow lying between Thomas Williams and Samuel Freemans and that part of my medow at the Great Meadow, that lyeth between Josiah Cooke and the Eel Creek; all this abovesaid land and meadow, I give to my son Steven, and the heirs
lawfully begotton of his body, forever.

Item. To my Son John Snow, I give all that my land at Paomet, purchased
or unpurchased whether upland or meadow; and all my right, title or privilege at Paomett, I give to my son John Snow and to the heirs lawfully begotton of his body forever.

It.To my son Jabez Snow I give all my land lying between my house and my
son Thomas Paines, and seven acres att the Bass Pond lying between Daniel
Coles and William Browns and a half an acre of marsh at the end of it; and six acres of upland at the Herring Pond, and an acre and a half of meadow
at Silver Springs lying on the north side of William Walkers, and the
Cliff of upland adjacent to the abovesaid meadow and all the sedge ground about it to Ephriam Doanes and that part of my house he lives in as long
as my wife or I do live.

Item. I give him two acres of meadow at the Great Meadow lying between the
Eel Creek and Joseph Hardings.

Item. To my son Jabez I give that my four acres of meadow at Billingsgate
due to me unlayed out, all this aforesaid upland and meadow I give to my
son Jabez Snow, and the heirs of his body lawfully begotton forever.

Item. This my meadow about my house I give to my son Jabez.

Item. I give to my loving wife Constant Snow all my stock of cattle, sheep, horses, swine whatsoever to be at her disposall for her comfort and support
of her life with all the moveable goods I am possessed of; and after her decease stock and moveables to be equally divided amongst all my children.

Item. To my wife I give the pte. and disposal of that part of my house shee
now dwells in during her life time, and after her death to be my sons, Jabez Snow.

Item. I give to my loving wife that ten acres of upland att Porchett and 20
on Billingsgate Island, for her disposall for the comfort of her life; but if shee need it not, and leaves it undisposed of I give it then to my son Steven Snow; that 20 acres of upland att Billingsfate if my wife leaves it undisposed of, then to be my sons Jabez Snow.

I do give to the Church at Eastham for the furniture of the Table of the Lord with pewter, or other. I do say I do give ten shillings out of my estate after my wife's decease.

That this is my last Will and Testament I have sett my hand and seal,
this fourteenth day of November, one thousand six hundred and seventy and
six.
      NicholasSnow
Witnessed, signed and sealed, in the presenceof us:

      Samuel Treat
      Thomas Paine, Sen.

It is my desire that Dea. Samuel Freeman and John Mayo would overesee the same and faithful performance of this my last will and testament; and be helpful in any case of need concerning the same.


     

He married Constance Hopkins circa 22 May 1627 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.3,4,5 Nicholas died on 5 November 1676 at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3,6,7

Children of Nicholas Snow and Constance Hopkins

Citations

  1. [S329] Robert Charles Anderson, Great Migration Begins.
  2. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 6 pg 9.
  3. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 9,.
  4. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 692.
  5. [S615] Caleb Johnson, True Origin of Stephen Hopkins.
  6. [S38] Snow, Nicholas, Hawes, James W. , pg 6,.
  7. [S187] Eastham-Orleans, Smith, Leonard , pg 24.

Sarah Snow

F, b. circa 1632, d. 8 March 1697/98
     Sarah was born circa 1632 at Plymouth or Eastham, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Nicholas Snow and Constance Hopkins. She became engaged to William Walker on 25 January 1654/55 at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.2 She married William Walker on 25 February 1654/55 at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3,2 Sarah died on 8 March 1697/98 at prob. Eastham, Massachusetts.4

Children of Sarah Snow and William Walker

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 9.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 775.
  3. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol 6 pg 17,.
  4. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 17.

Temperance Lombard

F
     Temperance was born.1 She was the daughter of Benjamin Lombard and Hannah Whetstone , Whiston.

Citations

  1. [S28] Warren, Richard, Wakefield, Robert S. , pg 26.

Martha Lombard

F
     Martha was born.1 She was the daughter of Benjamin Lombard and Hannah Whetstone , Whiston.

Citations

  1. [S28] Warren, Richard, Wakefield, Robert S. , pg 26.

Sarah Walker

F, b. before 10 November 1622 (chr., d. 24 November 1700
     Sarah was born before 10 November 1622 (chr. at in St. Olave's Southwark, county Surrey, England. She was christened on 10 November 1622 at in St. Olave's Southwark, county Surrey, England.1 She was the daughter of William Walker. She married Nathaniel Warren on 19 November 1645 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.2,3 Sarah died on 24 November 1700 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.1

Child of Sarah Walker and Nathaniel Warren

Citations

  1. [S28] Warren, Richard, Wakefield, Robert S. , pg 5.
  2. [S28] Warren, Richard, Wakefield, Robert S. , pg 5,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 782.

William Walker

M
     William died. William was born.1 He was present at Sarah Walker's christening on 10 November 1622 at in St. Olave's Southwark, county Surrey, England.1

Child of William Walker

  • Sarah Walker+ b. before 10 November 1622 (chr., d. 24 Nov 1700

Citations

  1. [S28] Warren, Richard, Wakefield, Robert S. , pg 5.

Giles Hopkins

M, b. circa 1609, d. circa 1690
     His body was interred at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.1 Giles was born circa 1609 at England.2 He was the son of Stephen Hopkins and Mary. Giles died circa 1690 at Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts.3

Citations

  1. [S425] Cove Burying Ground.
  2. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol.6 pg 7.
  3. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 10.

Elizabeth Fisher

F, d. before 1651
     She married Stephen Hopkins on 19 February 1617/18 at in St. Mary Matfellon Whitechapel, London, England.1,2,3 Elizabeth died before 1651 at Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.3

Children of Elizabeth Fisher and Stephen Hopkins

Citations

  1. [S46] Mayflower Families, 5 Generation Series , vol. 6 pg 4,.
  2. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 387,.
  3. [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 387.